Class Notes (835,117)
Canada (508,937)
Sociology (3,230)
Lecture

lecture5

4 Pages
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 3357F/G
Professor
Jordan Harel
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture Five ▯October 24, 2013 Deviance and Deception in Action: White Collar Property Crimes Healthcare Fraud • Healthcare: largest industry in US • 15% of GDP (gross domestic product) • Stakeholders: doctors, hospitals, treatment centers, nursing homes, clinics, testing labs,  medical supplies, equipment, pharma, billing, record keeping and accounting firms • Extent of problem? • Estimated 10%/year • For $1 trillion dollar industry, that’s $100 billion per year • $238 million/day • $11 million/hour • Healthcare industry in US • In most cases, insurance covers costs, o Private, Medicare (seniors over 65), Medicaid (people with low income) • Contrary to most other transactions where consumer directly pays for product or service • What does this look like? o Reality: doctor submits the bill to the insurance company (electronic), computer  pays out doctor Prevention • Ideally at point of claim submission • Problem is 3 fold: o Size o Complexity o Structure Size, complexity, structure • Medicare: 800 million claims filled per year • Computerized system of payment • Difficult to look for patterns ▯ things can be swept under the rug o If someone had a physical, and needed a cast on their finger there are probably  lots of cases like this out of 800 million • Resources for fraud control: time, people and money • All of the above could be delegated to claims processing • Tension? o Speed vs. pattern o If you want to go fast, using people is very difficult o Computers are not as good at looking for patterns Healthcare fraud “on the ground” • Government now beginning to use big data in order to sift through patterns  • Use to be a pay and chase model: pay doctor then chase them down for money Fraud in Banking • Banking: deposit money, bank keeps it safe and provides you with: ATM access, cheque  writing capacity, potential interest • What does the bank do with your money? o Loan it out Banking industry • How do they make money? • Difference between interest paid out to depositors, and money brought in through loan  interest • Other service fees • Competitive pressure: keep deposit rates high, and loan interest low Regulations • Reserve requirements: money set aside for things like faulty loans • Deposit insurance: U.S.  ▯FDIC $250,000 and Canada  ▯CIDC $100,000 • Prohibits self­loans o People who own banks can’t sign off loans to themselves Banking Fraud • Bidirectional: banks can be victims or perpetrators • Banks as victims o Employee embezzlement (deposits, withdrawals)  Specialized access o Scam artists disguised as “legitimate business people” (loans given on account of  fraudulent and misleading information) • Banks as perpetrators o “The best way to rob a bank is to own one.” o Bank owners: loan on favourable terms o Unlawfully risky loans Securities Fraud • What is a security? o Evidence of ownership, creditorship or debt • Examples: stocks, bonds, mutual fund shares, promissory notes, government savings  bonds • Why invest? Securities: background • Private company: not publicly traded or listed on a stock exchange • Companies listed on stock exchange: public o Apple, gap, etc • Most public stock is owned by outsiders • Trust important element: need to believe what company is telling you • Trust: opens door for white collar crime Five types of securities offenses • Misrepresentation: lying about the value or condition of a security o Example? Saying “I am 100% sure there is oil here” to get people to invest • Stock manipulation: artificially manipulating the price of a security o Example? Saying “I am 100% sure there is a lot of gold in the mine” causes a ton  of people to start buying stock. Two months later people finally figure out there is  no gold at all in the mine • Misappropriation: old fashion stealing o Example? Saying you will invest someone’s money, then taking it and leaving • Insider trading: when people trade on the basis of non­public information that is relevant  to the price of a stock o Example? Giving insiders speci
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 3357F/G

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit