Class Notes (834,037)
Canada (508,290)
Sociology (3,229)
Kim Luton (96)
Lecture

Inventing Family.docx

6 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
Sociology 1020
Professor
Kim Luton
Semester
Winter

Description
Family Basic Concept Social institution that unites people in cooperative groups to oversee the bearing and raising of children Kinship: A social bond based on blood, marriage or adoption Family Unit: Two or more people who are related by blood, adoption, marriage or some other form of extended commitment and who reside together (cohabitation) Nuclear Family (SNAF): 1 or 2 parents and their unmarried children. Most common. With increased industrialization and mobility, there is an increase in SNAF. Extended Family: Nuclear family plus other kin (e.g. immigrant family, Aboriginals, First Nations) Marriage: Agreed mating agreement, usually a ritual. Endogamy: Marriage between people of same social category (marrying within) Exogamy: Marriage between people of different social category (marring out) Propinquity: Spatial proximity (60% will marry someone within 20 blocks of you) Homogomy: People marry those like themselves regarding religion, ethnicity, education, etc. (think characteristics) Heterogamy: Marriage between people who are dissimilar “The World is your oyster” BUT… Each society governs norms/values, so our marriage choices are governed by social choices. Lone Parent Families - Since 80’s, lone-parent families are the fastest growing (cohabitation is 2 ) - 3.2% male vs. 12.7% female - 1951: Almost all widowed Now: 58% due to divorce & 20% due to never married parent - Lifetime probability  women = 34% vs. men = 23% - Females: o More likely to have lived in common-law relationships, had children earlier, and have less education than married women of same age o Double Disadvantage: Have to do it all: work + children’s needs o Most disadvantaged are those with no support, no education, and no working skills o “Feminization of Poverty”: 80% of females live below low-income family Structural-Functionalist - Society depends on families  Family is a key institution in society - Critique: o Glosses over diversities in family life o Only considers SNAF o Doesn’t look at negative aspects - The family performs vital tasks: 1. Socialization 2. Regulation of Sexual Activity  Kingsley Davis said marriage is important to maintain sexual behaviour 3. Social Placement  Everyone knows their status, and place in social hierarchy 4. Material and Emotional Security Social-Conflict Analysis - Family plays a role in social stratification - Family perpetuates social inequality: 1. Property and Inheritance:  1 generation to the next, maintains status hierarchy  Wealthy gets wealthier 2. Patriarchy:  Perpetuate gendered order  Male = Dominant vs. Women = Subordinate 3. Racial and Ethnic Inequality:  Society in terms of social forces encourages endogamy Symbolic Interactionism - Explores how individuals shape and experience family life - Family living offers an opportunity for intimacy - Family members share activities and build emotional bonds - Courtship and marriage may be seen as forms of negotiation - “The Best Deal” = Social Exchange theory - Family = Social Exchange 1/6 = heaven | 1/3 = average | 1/3 = good | 1/6 = hell Feminism - Family perpetrator of gender roles - Rethink notion that famillies in which no adult male is present are automatically a cause for concern - Better a child lives in lone-parent family with low conflict, than family with both parents and high conflict Future Change and Continuity - Marriage not likely to go out of style - Biggest Change: Liberation of gender roles and an unlinking of gender and caring - Women work and men care for children more - Within a decade, 2%-3% of births result of New Reproductive Technologies (NRT) “Test Tube Babies” - 62% of families are dual-earning - Not as gender bound as feminism make it out to be Descent System Descent: The way people trace kinship (who belongs, inheritance rights) over generations Bilateral: Descent traced through both mother’s and father’s side of family (  gender equality) Patrilineal: Descent is traced only to father’s side (legitimate son’s inheritance, resources, etc.) Matrilineal: Descent is traced only to mother’s side Residential Patterns Patrilocality: Married couples live with or near the husband’s family Matriolocality: Wife’s family Neolocality: Alone Marriage and Arrangement Marriage: A legally sanctioned relationship, usually involving economic cooperation as well as sexual activity and childbearing, that people expect to be enduring Marriage can be defined as a commitment and an ongoing exchange: - Commitment: Fairly explicitly contracts with rights & obligations - Ongoing Exchange: Growing interdependence - Expressive Exchanges: Emotional demand, intimacy of thoughts (builds) - Instrumental Exchanges: Task oriented dimension  work, providing for family, etc. Marriage Patterns - Monogamy: Most industrial societies prescribe this and only legal form in Canada - Serial Monogamy: Marry, divorce, remarry, etc. -
More Less

Related notes for Sociology 1020

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit