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Lecture

AR103 - Sep28.pdf

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Department
Archaeology
Course
AR103
Professor
Jonathan Haxell
Semester
Fall

Description
AR103 - Week 3 - Sep. 28 2011 A Survey of the Primates Strepsirhini - Strepsirhini populations have the most well developed sense of smell of the primates. Mostly nocturnal and frugivorous. - Do to being nocturnal they have large ears. - “tapetum lucidum” - light in carpet, very sensitive vision in the dark from the cells in their retina's - Many strepsirhini’s have 4 fingernails and a single claw, but not all strepsirhini populations have this characteristic. The single claw is used for grooming, usually on the index finger. Haplorhini[Suborder] - Haplorhini have a larger body size and body size-brain ratio compared to the Strepsirhinis - Diurnal populations ▯ Tarsiiformes[Infraorder] - Arboreal populations - Nocturnal populations - Insect and fruit eating population - Most like the strepsirhini’s of all the haplorhini’s - Quadrupedal - Locomotion pattern: climbing and leaping Simiiformes[Infraorder] - Orthognathic (flat faced) - Diurnal populations except some ▯ ▯ Platyrhini [Parvorder] - Monkeys of the New World - Entirely arboreal populations - Some have a prehensile tail (gripping tails) - Live in larger groups, more complex social organization - Smallest of the monkey populations ▯ ▯ Catarhini[Parvorder] - More upright populations - More terrestrial oriented - Live in large more social groups - Africa and Asia ▯ ▯ ▯ Cercopithecoidea[Superfamily] - Old-world monkeys - Spends more time in a land based environment - Seeks shelter after dark in trees or high rock shelter - Finds most of their food in terrestrial environments - Live in relatively large and complex social organizations - Dominance hierarchies - Helps organize groups - Long post-natal care/socialization - Play is important in the development through growing in a social organization - Females experience what is called estrus during mating - Affiliative behaviour, includes grooming, present in all primate populations, particularly Old World monkeys which use it as monetary 1 AR103 - Week 3 - Sep. 28 2011
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