Class Notes (835,600)
Canada (509,275)
CS100 (222)
Lecture

6. Image Technologies and the Emergence of Mass Society-OH.docx
Premium

5 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS100
Professor
Martin Morris
Semester
Fall

Description
CS 100B INTRODUCTION TO MEDIAHISTORY WINTER, 2014 Dr. Martin Morris Image Technologies and the Emergence of Mass Society Introduction Rosalynd Williams, “Dream Worlds of Consumption” o The Paris Exposition or World Fair, 1900. Not abstract progress displayed, but the wonders  of consumption.  o Over the decades, the dominant tone of these expositions altered. The emphasis gradually  changed from instructing the visitor in the wonders of modern science and technology to  entertaining him.  o “The School of Trocadéro.” o One journalist was able to explain why he found the fair so disturbing. Talmeyr: the  colonial exhibits had become “a gaudy and incoherent jumble of "Hindu temples,  savage huts, pagodas, souks, Algerian alleys, Chineses, Japanese, Sudanese,  Senegalese, Siamese, Cambodian quarters ... a bazaar of climates, architectural styles,  smells, colors, cuisine, music." Reproductions of the most disparate places were  heaped together to "settle down together, as a Lap and a Moroccan, a Malgacheand a  Peruvian go to bed in the same sleeping car . . . the universe in a garden!"  o The exposition of 1900 provides a scale model of the consumer revolution o Great increase in emphasis on merchandising, but the important change was how this  merchandising was now accomplished—by appealing to the fantasies of the  consumer. o “Fantasy which openly presents itself as such keeps its integrity and may claim to  point to truth beyond everyday experience.” But fantasy used as an alluring  handmaiden of commerce loses its independence. o A corruption of dreams o A pleasurable escape from the work­world is a sales pitch in disguise o “From earliest history we find indications that the human mind has transcended concerns of  physical survival to imagine a finer, richer, more satisfying life. … art and religion  o “Consumer goods, rather than other facets of culture, became focal points for  desire.” 1 o For example, the department store.  o Other examples of such environments: expositions, trade fairs, amusement parks, shopping  malls and large new airports or even subway stations. o numbed hypnosis induced by these places is a form of sociability typical of modern  mass consumption  o “What is less appreciated, but what amounts to a cultural revolution, is the way electricity  created a fairyland environment, the sense of being, not in a distant place, but in a make­ believe place where obedient genies leap to their master's command, where miracles of speed  and motion are wrought by the slightest gesture, where a landscape of glowing pleasure  domes and twinkling lights stretches into infinity.” o Above all, the advent of large­scale city lighting by electrical power nurtured a collective  sense of life in a dream world.” 2 Susan Sontag, “On Photography” “An ethics of seeing” “Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the  environment we recognize as modern.” Difference from paintings “To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain  relation to the world that feels like knowledge­and, therefore, like power… What is written about  a person or an event is frankly an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like  paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so  much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire.” “Photographs furnish evidence… the camera record incriminates. o a useful tool of political surveillance and control  The camera record justifies—proof that something happened. “The picture may distort; but there  is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what's in the picture.” But the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness does  not indicate a generic artistic exception for there is always a subjective composition to the  photograph: “In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another,  photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in  which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an  interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are.” “This very passivity—and ubiquity—of the photographic record is photography's "message," its  aggression. Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less  aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, st
More Less

Related notes for CS100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit