Class Notes (838,987)
Canada (511,153)
CS100 (222)
Lecture

5. Electricity creates a wired world-OH.docx
Premium

5 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS100
Professor
Martin Morris
Semester
Fall

Description
CS 100B INTRODUCTION TO MEDIAHISTORY WINTER, 2014 Dr. Martin Morris Electricity Creates the Wired World Tom Standage, “Telegraphy—the Victorian Internet” o Communication is (in theory) separated from transportation (but in practice the two worked  hand in hand) o Earlier forms: talking drums, smoke signals, the heliograph of the ancient Greeks, the  sephamore communication between ships using flag signals. Also the optical telegraph in  France… o With the telegraph, words were transformed into electrical impulses o This was not well understood by people unfamiliar with the technology. After all, they didn’t  need to know anything to use it—unlike the other earlier methods of sending messages  without messengers. Michael Schudson, “The New Journalism” The struggles of the New York press for readership in the late nineteenth century ushered in two  dominant models: ‘news as information’ and ‘news as entertainment.’ 1. Telling ‘stories’: news has an ‘aesthetic’ function 2. Conveying information: news provides the facts without a ‘frame’ or interpretation  Story­telling versus objective accounts of news—importance of framing. o Is purely objective news possible? Schudson’s main thesis: “there is a connection between the educated middle class and  information and a connection between the middle and working classes and the story ideal.” o Concept of social class and the relation between class and consciousness or class  ideology Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World and William Randolph Hearst’s Journal—the two most widely  read newspapers in New York at the turn of the 20  century.  Pulitzer’s innovations in business practice: o Advertising rates  1 o Sensationalism o Use of illustrations o Larger and darker headlines o Sunday papers and comic strips and cartoons An enlargement of the "entertainment" function of the newspaper  o Related to changes in urban experience o Newspapers adapt to the new experiences of the middle class and the working class Journalism as Information: The rise of the New York Times o Adolph Ochs takes over the New York Times in 1896: “All the News That’s Fit to Print” o Emphasis on objective news reporting, fair coverage and ‘decency’ (that is, not lurid  sensationalism) o “A newspaper was declared to be a companion, and surely the intelligent would not  accept as a companion the vicious and the depraved” (W.W. Canfield, city editor, Utica  Observer). o A moral dimension to the reading of different kinds of newspapers  o High culture vs. popular culture o The moral war between information journalism and story journalism was a cover for  class conflict. o ‘Objectivity’ in news? Always a myth… 2 Claude S. Fischer, “The Telephone Takes Command” o Bell leases the instruments and licenses to local providers of telephone service—a  "system" of local "Bell Operating Companies" acting in concert. Allowed for a monopoly  (1880­1893). o As with the telegraph, early users of the telephone were businesses and professionals.  Still expensive by end of the 19  century. o Need to invent uses for the telephone  o The key was residential service  — the telephone system is a system, so the more users on it, the more attractive it  becomes to new users… James Carey, “Time, Space and the Telegraph” o The telegraph introduces a decisive separation of "transportation" and "communication."  o A decisive break, because now the telegraph allowed for centralized control along  many miles of track—an integrated system of transport and communicat
More Less

Related notes for CS100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit