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Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS101
Professor
Jeremy Hunsinger
Semester
Fall

Description
Mass Communications 10/8/2013 7:48:00 PM  Argument: The means by which we enter into intellectual exchange, and create new knowledge. Must not be broad. Involving disputing, challenging and revisiting existing ideas. It is your way into ideas.  Evidence: Collaborating reasons and facts. Looked up and understood instead of personal opinion. Beyond the immediate scope of the argument. Equal access; everyone has access to evidence. Opinion does not have equal access.  Claim: Basic proposition you are beginning from. Not always an argument doesn’t have a clear state of evidence. Mass Communications 10/8/2013 7:48:00 PM Premise Reasons for accepting an argument and its conclusion. Provides support to an arguments conclusion, it may have more than one premises. Soundness Sound = VALID Unsound = unvalid If it can be logically borne out to a conclusion if can be proved by evidence Inference The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or soon to be true Act of coming to a logical conclusion without actually having first hand knowledge of certain events Educated guess Fallacy An argument that uses poor reasoning Lead to an apparently sound conclusion according to faulty logic 12 Types of Fallacy 1. Slippery slope  small first step leads to a chain of related events cumulating in some significant effect. It attempts to discredit a proposition by arguing that its acceptance will undoubtedly lead to a sequence of events one or more of which are undesirable 2. Not a cause for a cause  two events may occur one after the other or together because they are correlated by accident or due to some other unknown event. One cannot conclude that they are casually connected without evidence 3. Not true Scotsman  General claim may sometimes be made about a category of things. When faced with evidence challenging that claim. Rather than accepting or rejecting the evidence, such an argument counters the challenge by arbitrarily redefining the criteria for membership into that category. 4. Guilt by association  is discrediting an argument for proposing an idea that is shared by some socially demonized individual or group. 5. Genetic Fallacy  An argument origin or the origins of the person making it have no effect whatsoever on the arguments validity. Genetic fallacy is committed when an argument is devalued or defended solely because of its history 6. Equivocation  Exploits the ambiguity of language by changing the meaning of word during the course of an argument and using the different meanings to support some conclusion. It is a misleading use of a term with more than one meaning or sense 7. Circular Reasoning  One of four types of arguments known as begging the question where one implicitly or explicitly assumes the conclusion in one or more of the premises. Another way of beating around the bush. 8. Argument from consequences  is speaking for or against the validity of a proposition by appealing ot the consequence by accepting or rejecting it. Just because a proposition leads to some unfavorable result, does not mean it is false 9. Appeal to irrelevant authority  10. Appeal to ignorance  such an argument assumes a proposition to be true simply because there is no evidence proving it is not 11. Appeal to hypocrisy Countering a charge with a charge. Rather than addressing the issue being raise with the intention by diverting the attention away from the original argument. 12. Appeal to fear  Plays on the fears of the audience by imaging a scary future that would be of their making if some proposition were accepted. Mass Communications 10/8/2013 7:48:00 PM Research Question: extends beyond personal opinion or preference. Can be documented with evidence. Who, what, when, where, why. Research guided by questions Critically examine sources Context: what form did it originally appear and where was it published Significance: Is it still relevant Practicality: Can you understand the material Audience, User, Maker: When you're participating in social media your actions are seen by others Active Engagement  Actively posting Passive Consumption  Just browsing and reading through  Consuming but not engaging MID TERM REVIEW!! 10/8/2013 7:48:00 PM WEEK 1 Digitization: act of converting data or images to digital format. New media arises out of the process of digitization Fragmentation: increasing range of media in relation to channels. Increases the viewers consumption choice Corporate Consolidation: Unify multiple entities into one. Companies are combine to form a new corporation or one firm absorbs another. Convergence: merging of mass communication outlets - print, television, radio, internet along with portable and interactive technologies through various digital media platforms CRTC: Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission Public Broadcasting System: CBC: Canada Broadcasting Corporation Merging: Combine to form a single entity(commercial organization) Acquisitions: Asset or object bought or obtained; an act of purchase of one company by another Validity Claims (Jergen Habermans): Claiming to have made a correct statement Priority Programming: Communication Studies: Academic field that deals with processes of human communication, commonly defined as the sharing of symbols to create meaning. How messages are interpreted through political, cultural, economic, social dimensions of their context Canadian Content Regulations: Minimum number of Canadian programs, Amount of Canadian music on radio must be 35% during prime time, 5% of income must be given to CRTC to improve Canadian programming High brow:  Synonymous with intellectual  Elite  Connotation of high culture Low brow  Not highly intellectual  Uninterested, uneducated, uninvolved in intellectual activities WEEK 2 context: what form did it originally appear and where was it published significance: is it still relevant practicality: Can you understand the material active engagement: actively posting online passive consumption: Just browsing through information, consuming but not engaging convergence: the interlocking of computing and information technology companies, telecommunication networks, and content providers from the publishing, magazines, newspapers and entertainment software. Convergence refers to separate technologies such as voice, data, and video, data and video that share resources and interact with each other synergistically. alternative media: many different media outlets, we produce some of them horizontal integration: The absorption into a single firm or several firms involved in the same level of production and sharing resources at that level vertical integration: buying everything in their supply chain all the way through. control everything Research question  Who, What, When, Where, Why, How  Research guided by questions Canadian media ownership (largest) 1.CTV Globe Media 2.Can West 3. Quebecor 4. Rogers 5. Shaw Public Broadcasting:  Providing media and content Canadians are meant to watch  Funded and serves Canadians  Inform, Educate and Entertain  Ex. CBC, TVO  Includes radio and television program or signal for public views Canadian Values: - Multiculturalism: Doctrine that several different cultures (rather than one national culture) can coexist peacefully in a single country - Nationalism: Patriotic feeling, principles or efforts. Extreme nationalism is a feeling of superiority over other countries Pluralism  System where in which two or more states coexist  Minority groups maintain independent cultural traditions Multiculturalism:  Doctrine that several different cultures (rather than one national culture) can coexist peacefully in a single country Canadian Democracy BBC model 1. INFORM – part of democracy 2. EDUCATE – well informed induviduals 3. ENTERTAIN – get people to watch CBC/BBC relationship cultural domination  One culture dominates all others in size and influence either by force or naturally Americanization:  Assimilation into American culture Cultural Sovereignty  Control of own “cultural sphere” within a nation  Canadians worried about becoming too Americanized  pushing broadcasters to have Canadian-content  Canadian ideals vs. Local Ideals Cultural Policy  To become more or less integrated in Canada  Institutions of media operate within and through  Govern museums and educational institutions Cultural Policy on Canadian Content  Minimum number of Canadian program  Amount of Canadian music on radio must be 35% during prime time  5% of income must be given to CRTC to improve Canadian programming CRTC  Canadian Radio-television and telecommunications corporation MAPL: Canadian Content “Test”  Music  a Canadian must compose the music  Artist  the music must be performed by a Canadian  Performance  Must be recorded and broadcasted in Canada  Lyrics  must be written by a Canadian Cultural Elitism  The tendency to think that your culture and media is superior to every other culture High Culture  Set of cultural products held in high esteem by a culture  Sub-culture Low Culture  Derogatory term for some forms of popular culture that have mass appeal  Contrast to high culture  Sub-culture Political Spectrum  A way of modeling different political positions  Places them on one or more geometric axes that symbolize indepenedent dimensions Bias of News Media  A non-researched opinion  Media is left-leaning Lincoln Commission  Separate and identify Canadian content by sector  Prime-time has to have certain amount of Canadian content  Wanted to change Broadcasting Act to include non-profit broadcasters Broadcasting Act Neoliberalism  Politico-economic theory favoring free trade, privatization, minimal government intervention in business, reduced public expenditure on social services Liberalism  Political orientation that favors social progress Argument  The means by which we enter into intellectual exchange  Create new knowledge  Must not be broad  Involving disputing, challenging and revisiting existing ideas  It is your way into ideas Claim  Basic proposition you are beginning from  Not always an argument doesn’t have a clear state of evidence. Evidence  Collaborating reasons and facts  Looked up and understood instead of personal opinion  Beyond the immediate scope of the argument  Equal access; everyone has access to evidence  Opinion does not have equal access WEEK 3 Premise  Reasons for accepting an argument and its conclusion  Provides support to an arguments conclusion  May have more than one premise Unsoundness  Invalid Soundness  Valid  If it can be logically borne out to a conclusion if it can be proved by evide
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