Class Notes (834,331)
Canada (508,487)
CS235 (65)
Lecture

Lecture 2

5 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication Studies
Course
CS235
Professor
Matthew Flisfeder
Semester
Winter

Description
Communications research methods  Lecture 2  Next Monday at beginning of lecture research project due  Mylearningspace/content/course overview  Difference between a popular press book and an academic book – look at the publisher  Producing knowledge; discovery, interpretation, and criticism  •  A brief history of communication ethics o Ancient Greece  Concerned about how values translated into actions   o Age of enlightenment (18  – early 19  centuries)  Envisioned the ideal scientist as dispassionate and detached from  human values and norms and searched for objective truth in  empirical evidence  o  Social critics   Utilitarian ethics: Balancing the potential benefits and harms of  scientific research   o Nuremberg code   A general international consensus developed around “permissible  medical experiments”   o  Universal declaration of human rights (1948)  United nations commission which established three principles for  ethical research: beneficence, respect for the autonomy of persons,  and justice  o Institutional review boards   Groups responsible for establishing and implementing formal  research codes of conduct    o Principle of informed consent   Research participants must understand the potential risk associated  with their participation and have the choice to opt out   o Tri­council policy statement (TCPS)  A common Canadian code for all research disciplines   Code must be observed by researchers to receive grant funding  from institutions such as SSHRC, NSERC, and CIHR    “Respect for human dignity requires that research involving  humans to be conducted in a manner that is sensitive to the  inherent worth of all human beings and the respect and  consideration that they are due.”  Three areas of concern  • Respect for persons  • Concern for welfare • Justice    o  Research Ethics Board (REB)  Ensures compliance of codes and conduct developed and expressed  by the TCPS   Each university with active research must have an administrative  unit in which new research is submitted for review   Reviews all research involving human participants taking place at  universities   Minimal Risk  • If the probability and magnitude of possible harms implies  by participation in the research is no greater than those  encountered by participants in those aspects of their  everyday life that relate to the research    Delegated Review  • For studies deemed to pose minimal risk; can be approved  by a single member of REB  • Principles of justice ethic  o Distributive justice  If any one social group is unlikely to benefit from the research, its  members should not be subjected to the risks of participation  The costs and benefits of a decision should be distributed fairly o Procedural justice   Everyone has the opportunity to participate equally, even though  some may benefit more than others  o Corrective justice   Those who have befitted last or been harmed in the past should  benefit most from present decisions  • Ethical choices: getting started o Motives for research projects and topics  o When deciding on your research question, ask yourself:   What are your motives for doing the research?   Is it practical? Can it be answered with research?   Do you have the resources?   o Rights and responsibilities of research participants  Right to freely choose research participation  • Informed consent  o Any potential risks and benefits of the research is  communicated to potential study participants in a  language they can understand  o Status differentials      Right to privacy  • Anonymity  • Confidentiality    Right to be treated with honesty  • REBs determine whether the benefits of gaining particular  information and observations from participants merit  omitting information and/or deceiving participants  o Debriefing   Telling participants the full truth after  omitting or falsifying information o Reporting and evaluating research ethically  o You must always assess the potential consequences that the conduct and  publication of your research study has for yourself and others  o You need to consider how researchers who come after you might be  affected by your presentations of publications   Plagiarism  • The act of representing another person’s words, ideas, or  work as your own   • Methodological ways of knowing  o Knowing by discovery   The belief that knowledge is obtained through the process of  discovery  Knowing by discovery accepts several fundamental assumptions  • Belief that 
More Less

Related notes for CS235

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit