Class Notes (835,674)
Canada (509,327)
Economics (1,511)
EC255 (85)
Lecture

EC246_outline_201

8 Pages
246 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
EC255
Professor
Jim Mc Cutcheon
Semester
Fall

Description
EC246  Positive and Normative Aspects of Income Distribution  Department of Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University  Fall 2013    Monday / Wednesday   Section A :   11.30‐12.50pm, P3067   Section B:  1‐2.20pm, P3067     Contact Information  Instructor:  Christine Neill  Office: P2034  Office Hours:  Mon, Wed:  10‐11.30am  Phone: (519) 884‐1970, ext. 2469  Course website:  MyLearningSpace (MyLS)  Email:  via MyLS only, please    I cover roughly the same material in each of these time slots.  I do not mind which section you attend, or  if you switch between sections from week to week, unless there is no seating available in one of the  slots.  Note that while I cover roughly the same material in each class, there may be slight differences, so  it is always safer to attend the same section consistently.    Calendar Description  “The study of the distribution of income measures how the output of the nation is shared among the  individual and household units of society. The positive aspect of income distribution measures and  explains how income is actually distributed in Canada.  The normative aspect of income distribution asks  how income should be distributed in Canada.  Government redistribution of income through taxes and  transfers is also considered.”  Pre‐requisites:  EC120, EC140.  Exclusion:  EC310t  Course Overview  EC246 is about economic approaches to understanding how income is distributed across individuals and  households, and about policies that could change this distribution.    The calendar description does not mention a few things we will discuss in this course.  We will examine  the distribution of wealth and of other measures of well‐being than income.  We will also look at how  individuals move up or down the income distribution within and across generations (income mobility).   And the course will not be quite as Canada‐centric as suggested by the calendar description:  there is  important research on the income distribution from other countries (especially the US) and global  inequality is  major concern.   A full list of the topics we will cover is on the weekly schedule.  The calendar description places a stronger emphasis on normative questions than we will cover in the  course.  I will post optional extension resources that can help you to explore these issues in more detail  if you wish.  If you are interested in taking a course that puts these issues from and centre, you should  consider PO350 (Theories of Justice).  A full list of the topics is on the reading list and weekly schedule.  Course Goals and Learning Outcomes  By the end of this course, you should be able to:  1.  Calculate key distributional (or other) statistics given (a) a data set; (b) a mathematical formula;  and (c) a spreadsheet program [data quizzes; data assignment; final exam]  2. Use formulae for variance and mean decompositions to describe determinants of inequality  [final exam]  3. Find primary economic research on a set topic and outline the methods and findings of that  research [annotated bibliography/video/Income in Canada  assignment]  4. Describe current levels of inequality and recent changes, and use economic concepts to analyse  policies to affect inequality, includingome which have not been explicitly covered in class.  [Income in Canada assignment; data assignment; annotated bibliography; final exam]  5. Describe how statistical analysis is used to examine a particular economic or policy problem  [reading surveys; annotated bibliography/final exam]  6. Describe the basic set of redistributive policies used in Canada [final exam]  7. Show how theories of distributive justice, economic theory, and/or statistical analysis can be  applied to particular economic and/or social issues [reading surveys; annotated  bibliography/video; final exam]   Assessment    Due Date  Submit via  Marks  Data analysis quiz 1  Week 2  MyLS  3  Data analysis quiz 2  Week 4  MyLS  5  Data assignment  Week 5  Hard Copy  20  Reading surveys  Weeks 3, 7, 10  MyLS  9 (3 marks each)  Annotated bibliography  Week 12  MyLS  23  OR  Video on a core concept  OR  Replication of Income in  Canada chapter  Final exam  Exam period    40    Details of each piece of assessment will be provided in MyLS under Content/Administrative Information.   All assessment is due by 4pm on Friday of the week identified, unless otherwise stated.  Late assignments  I will accept late assignments, but with a 2 percentage point deduction from your final grade for each  day late, starting immediately after the deadline (each weekend day counts as a full day, and hard  copies cannot be handed in on the weekend).  That means if you hand in your data assignment two days  late, and get 10/15 for it, then your grade will be 10‐2*2 = 6/15.  Submitting any of the reading surveys  or data quizzes late will lead to a grade of zero.  There is very little you can do in one day to raise your  grade by enough to compensate for this penalty, so it is in your interest to submit on time.  Regrade requests  I will consider requests for regrades if submitted within two weeks of the posting of the mark for that  item on MyLS, and accompanied by a clear, detailed, and substantive written statement outlining the  grounds for the request.  (“I think I did better than a D‐“ is clear, but neither substantive nor detailed.)  How to ask questions in this course  All communication in EC246 should be either face‐to‐face (office hours, lectures) or through MyLS.    If you have any questions about the course material or general questions about assessment, please ask  either in lectures or over the MyLS bulletin boards.   Most questions you have are likely to be ones that  at least a few of your fellow students also have.  You’re doing them a favour by asking publicly rather  than privately, especially if you do so over the bulletin boards, since students can go back and check  them for answers.  This only works if you check  the boards before you post a question.  The bonus for  you of using the bulletin boards is that you get your questions answered faster – either because you find  your question has already been answered, or because often another student answers before I can.  I  really appreciate responses posted by other  students in the class.  Having some discussion of  substantive questions helps everyone learn more.  If there is ever any ambiguity about answers that are  provided by other students, I will clarify it, so no need to worry about misleading other students.  The only sorts of questions you should ask by email are ones that involve personal information, or that  only you could be interested in the answer to (such as why your grade for a particular assessment item  doesn’t appear).  Please use the MyLS email for this.  I cannot guarantee to answer promptly if you use  my @wlu.ca address.  If you have asked a question on content in a lecture or over the bulletin boards, and are still having  problems, please come to see me during office hours sooner rather than later.  You are always welcome  to come to see me during office hours for any reason.    I check the bulletin oards and email in MyLS regularly.  You should expect a response from me within  48 hours (except over the weekend).    Learning Materials and Aids (MyLS/External Links)   Weekly schedule:  tells you what the basic topics are, and what you should read to help you  understand the topics and issues;  tells you roughly what you missed if you missed class   Course outline/reading list:  tells you the topics and the bibliographic detail for each of the  readings. Lectures are based on them.   Lecture slides:  give a basic overview of content from class, will be posted on MyLS after the  lectures   Class notes:  sometimes act as a substitute, other times a complement, to journal articles/book  chapters   Practice questions:  a guide to the types of questions that can appear on the final exam; helps  you review your understanding of the course content.  I do not provide solutions, since there is  typicallynot a ‘right’ or a ‘wrong’ answer to most of the questions   Library:  can help you track down journal articles, online or hardcopy   Writing Centre: can give you advice on early drafts of your annotated bibliography   Learning Services:  can help with time management, exam preparation, etc  Note that I do not take attendance at class, or reward attendance with participation marks.  But  students who attend class regularly will inevitably perform better on the assessment than students who  have not, in part because they have been keeping up with the content and in part because I have no  compunction  about including a question on a test that has been covered in class in more detail than in  the readings.  Academic Integrity and Plagiarism  Please read the university policies regarding Academic Integri
More Less

Related notes for EC255

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit