Class Notes (839,076)
Canada (511,183)
Geography (296)
GG231 (53)
Rob Milne (25)
Lecture

Chapter 9 - Tornadoes.docx

3 Pages
112 Views

Department
Geography
Course Code
GG231
Professor
Rob Milne

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Description
Tornadoes Key Terms: Atmosphere – a layer of gases surrounding the planet, such as Earth Blizzard – A sever winter storm with large amounts of falling or blowing snow creating  low visibility. Winds must exceed a certain amount and visibility must be a certain  distance to be called a blizzard.  Coriolis Effect – Deflection of a moving object because of Earth’s rotation. Deflection to  the right in the northern and left in southern hemisphere. Drought – extended period of unusually low precipitation producing shortage of water  for people animals and plants Dust Storm – Storm that transports large amounts of airborne silt and clay. Visibility at  eye level drops significantly F­Scale – Series of values from F­0 to F­5 that describes the intensity of a tornado.  Developed by Theodore Fujita.  Heat Index – Numerical value that describes a persons perception of air temperature by  taking into account relative humidity.  Ice Storm – A period of freezing rain during which thick layers of ice accumulate on  cold surfaces Lightning – Natural high voltage electrical discharge between a cloud and the ground.  Relative Humidity – Ratio of the amount of water vapour in air to hypothetical amount  that would saturate the air at a given temperature and pressure. Tornado – A violently rotating funnel­shaped column of air extending downward from a  severe thunderstorm to the ground. Troposphere – Lower most layer of the atmosphere. Characerized by a decrease in  temperature with altitude.  Wind Chill – Additional cooling affect that wind has on humans in cold weather.  Wind Sheer – a sudden change in direction or speed of wind in a short distance. Watch – An alert issued by a meteorological agency that weather conditions are  favourable for sever weather such as tornadoes.  Front – boundary between cool and warm air masses. Cold Front – forms when cool air moves into a mass of warm air. Opposite for a warm  front.  Stationary Front – boundary that does not move much.  • Storm usually develops when a fast moving cold front comes into contact with a  slow moving warm front. Cold overtakes the warm front and com
More Less
Unlock Document

Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit