Class Notes (838,375)
Canada (510,867)
Philosophy (392)
PP111 (69)
Lecture 8

PP111 Lecture 8 Notes.docx
Premium

4 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PP111
Professor
Gary Foster
Semester
Winter

Description
PP111 Lecture 8 Notes Minds and Machines Mind­ Brain Identity Theory: A Reductionist Form of Materialism •  Reductionist Materialism:  Every Kind of mental state is (=) a kind of physical  state of the brain o Water is H 0 2 o Lightening is an atmospheric electrical discharge o A belief that it is raining is a particular electrochemical state of the  cerebral cortex o (Generalization of the mind and brain states) • Reductionist Materialism accepts generalizations about mind­brain  identities. Some Consequences of a Reductionist Form of Materialism • If two people have all the same mental states, then they will have all the same  brain states. • If two people have none of the same brain states, then they have none of the same  mental states. • Can we judge whether the physical shape and connected mental states means that  you are thinking of the same? Troubles for Reductionist Materialism • If feeling amused just is an increase in electrochemical activity in the inferior  temporal gyrus, then anything lacking an inferior temporal gyrus would be  incapable of feeling amused 1. Objection 1: Reductionist Materialism is Chauvinistic: a. Could nonhuman animals have minds? b. Could physiologically diverse aliens have minds? c. Could future supercomputers have minds? • Reductive Materialism says “No” • BUT: We can’t know the answer to these questions without empirical  investigation; to decide without checking is merely “chauvinism” • We should not be able to meet with aliens and predict in advance • Is there any good reason for why aliens cannot love? o Assuming humans can love: reductionists believe that only being with  the make up of humans can experience love 2. Objection 2: Multiple Realizability (The plastic of the Brain) a. Broca’s Area­ responsible for speech production and articulation Multiple Realizability • The same mental state can be physically constituted (“ realized”) in the brain in  more than one way. • So, something that does not have the same kind of brain we have, or whose brain  is not constituted in the same way ours is, can still have other kinds of physical  states that qualify as beliefs, desires, etc… Functionalist Theory of Mind • A nonreductionist form of the materialist theory of mind that allows for the same  types of mental states to have different physical constitutions (ie. different  physical realizations) • When we talk about our mental states, we are actually talking about our brain­ states, but in a vocabulary that describes their functional roles. • Functional Roles (functional identities): o Professors (tall, short, male, female) o Coffee tables (different materials) o Bait (different materials) o Beliefs (carbon based brain states, silicon based brain states) Some Important Consequences of the Functionalist Theory of Mind • Whether something has a mind has nothing to do with its particular physical  composition, but only with the functions (jobs, tasks) its part’s perform. • Physically different kinds of things can think, feel, etc., so long as they do what  we do when we think, feel, etc o Ie. Mental equivalence to us not= Physical equivalence to us but, Mental equivalence to us = Functional equivalence to us • Functionalism is then, a form of nonreductionist materialism.  It remains a form  of materialism, since mental states remain physical states, but it is nonreductionist  because no generalizations can 
More Less

Related notes for PP111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit