Class Notes (836,587)
Canada (509,861)
Philosophy (392)
PP213 (20)
Lecture 4

PP213 Week 4 Lecture.docx

6 Pages
79 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PP213
Professor
Matthew Grellette
Semester
Winter

Description
PP213 – Legal Philosophy Week 4 – January 29, 2013 H.L.A Hart: The Separation of Law & Morality The Separation Thesis  ▯what legal phenomena exists?; is the legal phenomena good or not?  Separate what is, from what ought to be. The command of a sovereign agent; compared to what law ought to be  ▯morality isn’t a factor  anymore. Legal Obligation  ▯nothing more than being under the threat of punishment; I am obliged to do  what I am threatened to do (Austin) The social fact of law, that deep down we are scared of being punished  ▯that fact stuck around  for a long time. H.L.A Hart 1907­1992 Practiced Law, went into WW2, worked as a decoder for the British Investigations Unit. Classical Positivism: 1. The Priority of the Descriptive/Explanatory Study of Law and Legal Practice 2. The Theoretical Separation of Law and Morality. 3. The Command Paradigm Hart tried to pry positivism away from this classical positivism model. “it is possible to endorse the separation between law and morals and to value analytical inquiries  into the meaning of legal concepts and yet think it is wrong to conciene of law as essentially a  command…” Distance that from Austin’s command theory. Austin’s command theory is “breathtaking in its simplicity and quite inadequate. There is much,  even in the simplest legal system, that is distorted if present as a command” He is not saying that there is not compulsion/threats in law, he is saying law is more complex  than just doing what someone is telling you to do.  Austin’s theory makes the law look like someone holding a gun to your head, Hart says there is  something so much more to law. Five Specific Problems with Austin’s Account: 1) Change in Government It is not clear how a brand new government can make laws compared to Austin command theory  paradigm. If you have to have the habitual obedience of your subjects in order to make law  ▯how   are you ever going to be able to make law? How would a new ruler be able to make law?  This is not the way our communities work; The moment someone new comes into power they  begin to make laws, they do not have to wait to gain habitual obedience. 2) Limited Sovereignty Constitutional Law = laws that serve as the backbone of the state; the law/a set of rules that puts  limits on the scope of our government. The sovereign is never under any binding powers. Everyone is in habitual obedience to them, so  as long as they enforce the orders that they give, they can do anything that they want. Constitution means that a sovereign ordered itself not to do anything. If you always have the  powers to change the rules whenever you want, then you are not really constrained. 3) Democratic Governance Democracy = The people rule themselves; the population of a community collectively issues  their own legal rules. Law comes from some political superior (sovereign), who issues orders under threat to the rest of  us. In democracy, we can think of the entire legal community as the sovereign, so that the entire  group of people is issuing commands to themselves. Austin says, that in a democracy, all of us would come together and act as a political superior so,  we become our own political inferiors, and we are issuing commands to ourselves under threat.  ▯ Austin’s theory does not work. 4) Problem of Rules Rules are simply a general command, they are nothing more than a set of commands from a  sovereign with a threat attached. Rules have a top down relationship, they come from someone in higher and they have told you  what to do, so you have an obligation to do it. Different Kinds of Rules: Duty Imposing cs. Power Conferring Duty Imposing  ▯It imposes a duty upon you, to act in a specific way; you have no choice. Power Conferring  ▯they give you the power/the privilege to act in a certain way if you choose  to; it gives you a choice. Law has a lot of power conferring rules (Example: Marriage, Running for Parliament, Contracts,  ect.) No one is threatened when you create a contract. 5) Disappearing Obligations Law is supposed to be capable of creating obligations that apply to all legal citizens at the same  time. Canadian law states that all citizens must pay taxes; we have a legal obligation to pay. 1) If you can guarantee that you won’t get caught, they you’re not really under a threat of  punishment. 2) And if you’re not under a threat of punishment, then on Austin’s theory – you’re not under and  obligation. 3) So if you cannot guarantee that you won’t get punished, then you’re not under an obligation to  allow the rules of law. Austin says that the moment you get out of range, your legal obligation disappears. Example: You move out of the country to Europe, you no longer have an obligation. Our obligations do not arise and disappear; our obligations exist because the rules say that they  have to. Obligations exist for as long as the rules are in play. Hart says 2 Things about Positivism: Legal officials were able to claim that Nazi Law was a properly formed law  ▯The German  officials took a positivist approach to law; German people had legal rules/terms to adhere to Nazi  Law. Positivist theory facilitated the Holocaust. German officials were good legal subject because they followed the law. Nazi Law went against Natural Law For Natural Law, Hart says to claim it was positivism  ▯but that if you do, that you are na ïve.  Our legal obligations are determined by the state; but when someone decides what to do in the  world you should consult your moral obligations. What you are told to do, and what you think you should do are two totally different things. If the government tells you to do something you do not say “okay, what?” – you take a step back  and say “let me think for a minute” If you want to legally punish Nazi war criminals, then maybe you have to turn to Natural Law. Case Study: The Grudge Informed Case This women in Berlin hates her husband for some unknown reason. In 19
More Less

Related notes for PP213

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit