Class Notes (836,562)
Canada (509,854)
Psychology (2,794)
PS260 (110)
Lecture

ps 260-1

20 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS260
Professor
David J White
Semester
Fall

Description
Cognitive Psychology PS260  A Brief History and Introduction  ▯Interdisciplinary Perspective (things that flow into cognitive) ­­ Philosophy: • formulates the fundamental questions that define the field  • asks us who we are and how we know  ­­ Neuroscience: • attempts to specify the relationship between mind and the brain  • scratching the surface still, major questions still remain  ­­ Artificial Intelligence: • models human thought processes with computer software and hardware ­­ Linguistics: • investigates the structure of language and the specifics of language use and what  they tell us about the mind  ­­ Anthropology: • investigates the mind through the lens of culture  Fore­runners of Cognitive Psychology   ▯Psychophysics • Study of the relationship between the physical properities of a timulus and the  properties taken on when filtered through the subjective experience  • Unconscious Inference  ­ perceived plays an interpretive orle ­ influenced by previous experience  ­ cognitive perceptual processes often occur outside of conscious awareness • Interested in early stages of info processing: interested in the storing, recalling  and application of information. Interested in the ways in which people perceive  and influence them in info processing Structuralism: The Contents of Mental Experience   ▯All conscious experiences can be broken down into basic mental elements ­ sensations: basic things we encode from our senses ­ feelings: emotions  ­ images: mental impressions   ▯Introspection ­ intense self­analysis of one’s conscious experience in order to identify mental elements  Functionalism: The Functions of Mental Experience   ▯objected to atomistic approach to consciousness proposed by structuralism   ▯stream of consciousness  ­ it is continuous and ever­changing, not static. Cannot be broken down into discrete  elements  ▯Given focus on mental processing rather than mental structure, it had more impact on  cognitive psychology than structuralism  Behaviorism: The Rejection of Mental Experience  ­ can only understand reinforcement and punishment  (operant conditioning) ­ behaviourism became the force in psychology   ▯Ebbinghaus: Pioneering Experiments on Memory (internal validity) ­ Recall was more difficult as list length increased  ­ retention increased with number of repetitions  ­ Forgetting function: memory performance declines over time interval since study  ­ early in the time interval, forgetting is rapid and then slows, suggests something is  going on worth learning about in the black box  ▯Bartlett’s Memory Research (ecological validity) ­ objected to tightly controlled laboratory methodology for studying memory  ­ wanted to apply things to reality ­ studied meaningful material to people, stories  ­ discovered errors in memory, errors in memory and recollection  ­ people did not forget, they fabricated and constructed memories  ­ suggests that memory is a reconstructive process guided by schemata (generalized  knowledge structures based on experience) ­ issues of validity ­ Bartlett high in naturalness  ­ Ebbinghaus high in experimental control  ­ critically think about studies based on these two validitys   ▯Gestalt Psychology  ­ hard wired understandings unconsciously we have  ­ emphasis on the role of organizational processes in mental processing  ­ the whole is different than the sum of its parts  ­ current cognitive psychology impacted by this approach in that it views the mind as an  active information processor  The Emergence of Cognitive Psychology   ▯S­R explanations: seriously wrong  ­ failure to account for data   ▯Learning without responding ­ animal has to respond and due something in response to stimulus in order to learn  according to behaviorism  ­ rat put in T maze ­ put some rats in the maze and some rats were pushed around by experimenters in rat  carts ­ they are not doing anything so behaviorist would say the rats in carts will not learn  ­ cognitive view would say they both will know where the food is because they both  experienced the maze  ­ results contradict behaviourists  ▯Learning without reinforcement  ­ in order to learn have to be rewarded  ­ Group one every time rat comes into center and gets food ­ group two is never reinforced  ­ group three is not reinforced until Day 11 (be way behind group one because of  reinforcement rate) ­ ones with no reinforcement: steady ­ continous get better  ­ after day 11: drops, they already knew the maze  ­ contradicts needing reinforcement to learn   ▯Tolman and cognitive maps  ­ behaviourist view: hit block B  ▯path 2 (hit block)  ▯path 3  ­ cognitive view: hit block b  ▯path 3 (90% of the time) ­ was not possible to study inner workings of the mind Key Concepts  ▯information processing: a computer metaphor ­ we have hardware, software  ­ brain hardware ­ cognitive processing = software ­ we process in parallel not in series ­ computers do one thing at a time in series Aristotle: ­ memory like wax ­ heating distorts past memories  Lecture 2 Connectionism: A brain metaphor for cognition   ▯accounts for cognition based solely on the hardware (the brain)  ▯Assumptions • Cognitive system is made up of billions of interconnected nodes that come  together to form complex networks  • Nodes can be activated and the pattern of activation corresponds to conscious  experience. Conscious experience is represented in patterns. • Knowledge is represented in patterns of nodes distributed throughout the vast  network  Overview of the Nervous System   ▯The Neuron  ­ the basic cell of the nervous system  ▯Electrochemical Information Processors  ­ Within a neuron (electrical) ­ action potential (electrical signal through the neuron) Between neurons ((chemical) ­ action potential causes release of neurotransmitters (chemicals) into the synapse   ▯The Brain  ­ Anterior (Rostral): Front Portion  ­ Posterior (Caudal): Back Portion  ­ Dorsal (superior): Top portion ­ Ventral: bottom  ­ Lateral: closer to periphery ­ Medial: closer to midpoint  ▯Three Main Areas of the Brain  ­ Hindbrain: • Basic life functions ­ Midbrain • Some sensory activities and regulate brain arousal  ­ Forebrain  • Comprises most of the brain • Consists mainly of the cerebral cortex  • Primary neural substrate for higher cognitive functioning  • AKA lizard brain  The Cerebral Cortex  ­ frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal  ­ broca’s area ­ wernicke’s area   ▯Frontal Lobe  • Posterior area (motor cortex): involved in voluntary motor movement  • Anterior area (prefrontal cortex): involved in planning and executing complex  actions  • Broca’s area: speech production   ▯Parietal Lobe  ­ important in attention and immediate memory   ▯Occipital Lobe  ­ primary visual cortex: responsible for vision and ability to recognize visual patterns   ▯Temporal Lobe  ­ auditory cortex: responsible for audition  ­ Wernicke’s area: involved in speech comprehension   ▯Association Areas ­ believed to integrate processing   Hemispheric Asymmetries  ­ contraleteral organization (LR/RL) ­ visual fields: each eye is split into two visual fields. Then both eyes feed into the other  side of the brain.   ▯Hemispheric Specialization  ­ right hemisphere: non verbal processing  ­ left hemisphere: verbal processing  Split Brain Patients ­ severed corpus callosum to stop seizures  ­ left hemi: verbal  processing (right visual field) ­ right hemi: non verbal processing (left visual field) ­ brain + heart  ­ what will they say? Heart  ­ what will they point to with their left hand? Brain  Subcortical Structures   ▯Limbic system  ­ intergral to learning and remembering new info  ­ processing emotion: • Hippocampus: vital for encoding new info into memory • Amygdala: regulates emotion and fear, forming emotional memories  • Thalamus: relay point that routes incoming sensory info to appropriate area of the  brain (olfactory does not go through) • Hypothalamus: controls endocrine system (horomones), plays an important role in  emotion and maintenance of survival processes (temperature regulation and food  intake) • Thalamus + Hypothalamus : dienceephalon  • Basil ganglia: critical role in controlling movement and motor based memories  The Tools of Cognitive Neuroscience  ­ criteria for assessing the utility of brain investigation techniques  ­ how well the technique informs the precise nature of the brain activity (how) ­ spatial resolution (where) ­ temporal resolution (when) Single and Double Dissociaions   ▯Single Dissociation: ­ examine patient with one area of brain damage ­ compare performance on two tasks proposed to dffer in the use of one cognitive process  ­ damage to brain area A shows deficits in process X, but not process Y  ­ weak evidence that brain A area is responsible for process X, but not process Y   ▯Double Dissociation  ­ examine two patients with diff. areas of brain damage ­ patient with damage to brain area A shows deficits in process X, but not process Y  ­ patient with damage to brain area B shows deficits in process Y, but not process X  ­ strong yet inconclusive that brain area A is responsible for X and brain B responsible for  Y  ­ be careful that the damage is responsible for the overall working  EEG techniques  ­ electrodes to m easure electrical activity created in neurons below  ­ reveals when a cognitive process occurs (temporal resolution) ­ difficult to pinpoint location (spatial resolution) Event Related Potentials (ERP) ­ change in electrical activity when an event occurs (the action potentials that occur in  relation to some event). ­ allows researchers to plot when and in addition to a rough idea of where important brain  activity is occurring MEG  ­ non invasive technique used to measure magnetic fields generated by small intracellular  electrical currents in neurons of the brain using superconducting quantum interference  device (SQUID) ­ meg provides info about neural activity and location of its sources  ­ better at analyzing than the EEG, better spatial resolution Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) ­ neural activity is stimulated by an electric current creased by a magnetic field  ­ similar to a lesion: deteted by a squid interferes with neural activity, basically producing  a temporary lesion  ­ put on particular parts of the brain to stop them from functioning  Imaging Techniques  ­ most commonly used neuroscientifc techniques  ­ blood flow is detected (more blood = more activity) ­ two scans are compared: one while performing a cognitive task and one when the brain  is relatively inactive (control scan) ­ difference indicates brain areas active during task ­ spatial resolution is better  PET scan  ­ inject radioactive substance ingested to track blood flow fMRI ­ hemoglobin has iron in it, which makes blood red  ­ track blood flow with hemoglobin ­ look at the flow of oxygenated blood flow  Brain Based Explanation: Caveat Emptor  ­ neuroimaging the new phrenology  ­ descriptive info about the location of brain activity that accompanies a cognitive  process, but no info about the process itself ­ logical flaw in conclusions drawn: brain A is active during cognitive process X. if  another task is found to involve brain area A, then it is assumed it involves process X  ­ not necessarily – brain area would be involved in many cognitive processes not just X  Current Trends  ­ the problem of meaning  ­ according to bruner, we have been overly confied by behaviorist methodology  ­ need to look at cognitive processing in meaningful contexts  ­ meaning matters  ­ bring in culture and association  ­ make cognitive psychology rep. richness. Lecture Three 1. Basic Issues in Perception  ▯Sensation: early processing and physiological (neuronal)  ▯Perception: later processing, psychological (interpretive) 2. Bottom­up and top­down processing   ▯bottom­up process (aka data driven) ­ based on info from stimulus   ▯top down process (aka conceptually­driven) ­ based on knowledge, expectations, context 3. Perception: Constructed or Directly Experienced?  ▯Constructive View  ­ emphasizes the role of top­down processing in arriving at a percept  ▯Direct View ­ emphasizes the role of bottom­up processing in arriving at a percept 4. The Basic Tasks of Visual Perception  ▯Pre­attentive Processing  ­ before attention is directed at a stimulus ray  ­ organization of an incoming stimulus array into discrete elements  ▯Post­attentive Processing  ­ after attention is directed at a stimulus array ­ identification of these elements for further processing and categorization 5. Perceptual Organizational Process  ­ grouping and region segementation: ­ grouping principles, similarity  ­ proximity 6. Good Continuation  7. Closure 8. Common Fate  9. Element Connectedness 10. 11. Figure­Ground  ­ tendency to segment a visual scene as a figure superimposed on a background ­ tend to give meaning to the things that are the figures and less to things in the  background  12. Global Precedence  ­ aspects of the environment that are processed first and automatically. The whole or the  parts? ­ classic study from Navon (1977): big letter made up of small ­ how long does it take to identify the letter? (H w/h) (Hw/s) 13.  Reaction Time measured  ­  no differences when identifying the big letter  ­ longer RT to identify the conflicting smaller letter  ­ assume this is  because we interpret the large thing first, global over the smaller 14. Is GPE universal  ­ tested himba and UK participants  ­ shown target then asked which is most like the target ­ UK picked circle of squares  ­ Himba picked square of circles ­ culture matters 15. Multisensory Interaction and Integration   ▯Synesthesia  ­­ strong synesthesia (rare) ­ input to one sensory modality produces a perceptual experience in that modality and  another one ­­ Weak Synesthesia (common) ­ linguistic cross­modal experiences (“cool” colours) ­ there are examples of really strong profound mixing of senses.. we are not individual  senses but there is an impact from one to another  ­ tend to be unidirectional and consistent (hear G see blue not see blue and hear G 16. Comparing the Senses   ▯vision AND audition  ­ VENTRILOQUIST EFFECT: “sound perceived as coming from visual display  ▯stimuli  ­ musician playing a single note on a marimba: ­ video showing a long note or shote note gesture  ­ no video  ­ results: (no video) notes judged to be the same length  ­ video: note with long note gesture was judged to be longer than note with short­note  gesture (video) 17. Vision and Chemical senses   ▯Stimuli  ­ white wine colored red led participants to describe the wine in terms of a red ­ what they see influences what they taste  18. Vision and Touch  ▯Rubber Hand Illusion: ­­ methodology: held cubes vibrated on top and bottom 21. Affordances: ­ Actions offered by an Object ­ can afford more food with more money  ­ used an apparatus: candy at the end of a long flat stick and an aperture ­ they have to put their hand in to get the candy ­ when they put their hand in and how well can we judge how big the opening is ­ no attempt, attempt to retrieve but get stuck or retrieve candy  ­ motor retention function: % of trials on which an attempt was made, regardless of  success ­ affordance threshold: aperture size at which an attempt was made and candy was  retrieved 50% of the time  ­ good at aperature perception: knew when aperture was big enough to retrieve candy  ­ motor decision function should be highest at aperture threshold and drop precipitously  below it   ▯Enhanced visual analysis for items in close physical proximity  ­ task difficulty: many letters was hard and few letters were easy  ­ imagination: hands on the side of computer monitor and hands behind back ­ wondering does this imagination have an impact on whether or not we put our hand  through the whole. Would it influence their performance?  ­ used RT to determine if target was present while measured ­ as the detail increased display size was increased ­ when asked to imagine if they had their hands on the screen, it improved their  performance ­ changes not just our perception but performance on the task   ▯Embodied Perception: ­ not just a variety of senses stuck in a meat sack, but they are embodied ­ stand at the bottom of a hill and estimate the slant, on top of that hill estimate the slant  of that too. At the bottom of the first hill you need to run as hard as you can up it, by the  time they got up was the way they asked to measure and their exhaustion matter? ­ verbal: what would you say that slant it ­ visual: have a circle thing line up with the angle of the hill ­ haptic: have a device and looking at the hill ­ then have them run up and then ask them what the angle of the second hill is  ­ when they engage their physical self they do better at guessing ­ in all three cases once they are exhausted they estimate the hill as being higher ­ tells us our visual perception is influenced by the way we try to figure it out ­ our physical state influences our perception ­­ participants did or did not suffer with minor but chronic pain of back  ­ ask them to estimate the distance from various traffic cones ­ why would pain in the lower back alter visual perception of distance  ­ it does, makes a diff.  judged them to be longer than those not suffering ­ experiences effect our perception and vice versa  ­ be aware that when this happens you’re also probably perceiving it as harder than it is  Lecture Four Witt and Proffitt (’08) ­ difficult just over 7 ft ­ easy under 1 ½ ft  ­ task: estimate size of the hole  ­ results: estimates of hole size were larger after easy than difficult putts. Activity  influenced their perception.  ­ another study found a similar thing.. negative correlation between estimate hole size and  golfing score  ­ all our senses impact one another ­ our physical state at the time too influences it ­ not only does our physical state influence it, but it influences our performance Consciousness   ▯Access Consciousness  ­ what the cognitive system is actually doing   ▯Phenomenal Consciousness  ­ knowledge of what our cognitive system is doing   ▯Monitoring consciousness  ­ ability to reflect on one’s cognitive processing  ­ these things are what make humans unique.. we are able to think about our thinking  (meta cognition)  ▯Self­Consciousness  ­ general knowledge of self  ­ most cognitive processes occur outside of phenomenal consciousness making self­report  hi
More Less

Related notes for PS260

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit