Class Notes (837,550)
Canada (510,314)
Psychology (2,794)
PS260 (110)
Lecture

ps 260-2

10 Pages
92 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS260
Professor
David J White
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter One ­ Perception: front end processes through which you organize and interpret incoming  information  ­ Attention: ability to attend is flexible but limited  ­ Immediate Memory: short­term/working memory ­ Identifying and Classifying Objects ­ Long­Term Memory: store for later use and retrieving ­ Autobiographical Memory: most dynamic  ­ Memory Distortion: forgetting and memory distortion  ­ Language: syntax and semantics ­ Decision Making: complex interplay among other cognitive processes such as attention,  memory and knowledge retrieval.  ­ Problem Solving: involves operating within constraints such as time and reaching a goal  from a starting state that is nowhere near that goal. Interdisciplinary Perspective ­ Cognition comprises half of the subject matter ­ provides critical insights into other sub disciplines that define psych ­ cognitive science: interdisciplinary effort to understand the mind with five different  disciplines: philosophy, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, linguistics, anthropology. Psychophysics ­ study of the relationship between the physical properties of a stimulus and the properties  taken on when the stimulus is filtered through subjective experience. ­ Gustav Fechner: there is not a one to one relationship between changes in the physical  intensity of a stimulus and changes in its psychological intensity. ­ Helmholtz: visual perception talk and process of unconscious inference. Perceiver plays  an interpretive role in what is perceived, perceptual and cognitive processes are  influenced by previous experience, perceptual and cognitive processes often occur  outside of conscious awareness ­ psychoscientists were among the first to apply scientific method to bridge the physical  and the mental. Structuralism: The contents of mental experience ­ model psychology after chemistry and can it be applied to conscious experience. ­ strucuralists said they could be broken down into three categories: sensations, feelings  and images.  ­ used introspection: a procedure that requires participants to provide rigourous, unbiased  report of every element of the conscious experience that accompanies the presentation of  some stimulus. ­ Titchener: termed structuralism ­ distill conciousness into its  basica elements  Functionalism: The Functions of Mental Experience ­ James: stream of conciousness to capture the continuous changing nature of our  experience (structuralism) he believed they should figure out the functions of the mind. ­ study the emotion of being angry and try to determine the purpose of being angry  (structuralist would attempt to determine the basic feelings and sensations of conscious  experience) ­ had a more profound influence on cognitive psychology than structuralism Behaviourism: The Rejection of Mental Experience ­ Watson proposed the banishment of consciousness because it does not lead to  observation, measurement, and repeatability. ­ behaviourism emphasized the study of observable responses and their relation to  observable stimuli. ­ S­R psychology, dedicate to discovering these connections. Between these connection is  a black box which houses consciousness.  ­ believed consciousness existed but they did not believe it could be studied.  ­ dominated experimental psychology In USA  Laying the Foundation for Cognitive Psychology ­ behavioursits wanted to establish psych as a rigorous experimental science alongside  other disciplines acknowledged as “scientific” ­ rigorous observation and measurement of mental processes is possible.  Ebbinghaus: Pioneering Experiments on Memory ­ complex mental processes could be submitted to experimental test.  ­ tested his own memory  ­ savings: refer to the reduction in trials it took to relearn a list. ­ found recall more difficult with a longer list  ­ ability to retain got better after repetition  ­ forgetting curve: memory performance declines over the time interval since study ­ forgetting occurs rapidly then slows down considerably ­ demonstrated well controlled experimental methods could be applied to study complex  mental processes ­ established a number of core principles of memory that are still being replicated and  extended in laboratory research today Bartlett’s Memory Research ­ objected to the use of tightly controlled lab studies  ­ should be as generalisitc as possible ­  characterized it as a reconstructive process rather than reproductive ­ schemata: generalized knowledge structures aobut events and situations that are  constructed based on past experience  ­ was an alternative to a S­R view and prescience foreshadowing some major concerns ­ left more to chance  Gestalt Psychology ­ role that organizational processes play in perception and problem solving  ­ configuration = gestalt  ­ the whole is different than the sum of its parts  ­ still has strong influence on how we view particular cognitive processes such as  perception and problem solving Learning without Responding ­ Responding is essential for learning  ­ rats that ran on their own would knows the correct response because R is required for  learning those rats that got a ride to the food also knew where to go.  Learning without Reinforcement ­ 3 diff rats in a complex maze and had them explore it  ­ reinforced, not reinforced, reinforced after 10 days  ­ rats in group 1 and 2 behaved as predicted ­ starting on day 12 they were as error free as the other rats and had been learning all a  long even without reinforcement = latent learning  Cognitive Maps ­ three possible responses: 1 had strongest S­R and 3 had the weakest ­ formed a mental map of the layout ­ freely explore the maze over a series of trials  ­ chose path 3 90% of the time when blocked  ­ failure of S­R theory  Lashley ­ science needs to explain both simple and complex  ­ argued complex cannot be dominated by a series of S­R connections  Chomsky ­ rejected the S­R view of language and claimed it to be vague and unscientific ­ concept of stimulus control has no meaning in language ­ stimulus loses all  meaning when applied to language  ­ the productivity and novelty observed in language use can be explained only by  appealing to mental representations  ­ behaviourism was failing  Technological Influences  ­ communications engineering: consider human thought processes and ways it might be  analyzed and investigated Computer Science  ­ input, processing and output… humans work the same way. Behaviourism Reconsidered  ­ behaviourism is still represented in a lot of the research and theorizing in current  cognitive psychology. Information Processing: A computer metaphor for cognition ­ pre­eminent paradigm for cognitive psych  ­ used the computer as a model for human cognition ­ humans are symbol manipulators who encode, store and retrieve and manipulate  symbolic data.  ­ active and creative information scanners and seekers who aren’t passive  ­ contrasts with behaviorist approach by saying they think step by step.  ­ classify brain as the “hardware” and the cognitive processes as “software” Connectionism: A Brain Metaphor for Cognition ­ major differences between humans and computers ­ humans do not work in a serial/step by step ­ brain does not have a central processor  ­ information is processed differently in each system ­ connectionism: uses the brain as a basis for modeling cognitive processes (replace info  processing) ­ the cognitive system is made up of billions of interconnected nodes that come together  to form complex networks.  ­ networks underlying cognitive processing operate largely in parallel  ­ processing involved in a given task does not occur in only one specific location; the  networks involved in cognitive processing are distributed throughout the brain.  ­ building blocks of these networks in a connection between two individual nodes and  how the neurons interact  ­ the connections are built up, solidified and modified  ­ connections between nodes are strengthened if they are activated at the same time  ­ models are used to generate predictions but it is often not used  The Brain: More than a metaphor ­ cognitive neuroscience is the most rapidly expanding research frontier  ▯ euron: basic unit. 100 billion neurons. Many located within the cerebral cortex.  ­ communication is an electrical process where the signal travels from the dentrites to the  cell body down the axon this is called an action potential.  ­ action potential causes the release of neurotransmitters in the tiny gap between the  neurons  ­ the neurotransmitters interact with the dendrite which lead to it being exhibitory or  inhibitory. ­ Hebb suggests the more the interact and the association becomes stronger   ▯The Brain  ­ primary focus of cognitive neuroscience  ­ anterior/rostal: front of brain  ­ posterior/caudal: back of the brain  ­dorsal/superior: top of the  brain  ­ ventral: bottom of the brain  ­ lateral: closer to peripheral  ­ medial: area closer to midpoint of the brain  ­  hindbrain: base of the brain: breathin heartbeat  ­ midbrain: sensory reflex ­ forebrain: comprises most of the brain and the cerebral cortex  ▯Cerebral Cortex  ­cerebral cortex: primary neural substrate/higher cognitive functioning ­ has two hemispheres with four lobes  ­ frontal lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe and occipital lobe ­ broca’s area (frontal lobe) related to production of speech  ­ parietal: regulate the process of attention and working memory ­ occipital: primary visual cortex responsible for vision  ­ temporal: auditory cortex and wernickes area (speech comphrension) Hemispheres ­ lateralized and communicate via the corpus callosum ­ left: verbal processing /language ­ right: non verbal/spatial ­ split brain relieve epileptic ­ stimulus left goes to right side but cannot go to left because of corpus callosum split Subcortical Structuresˆ ­ limbic system ­ help learning and remember new info and process emotion  ­ hippocampus: new info into memory  ­ amygdala: regulate emotion ­ thalamus: relay point for incoming sensory info  ­ hypothalamus: maintain important basic survival processes (temp reg.) ­ diencephalon: thalamus and hypothalamus  Tools of Cognitive Neuroscience ­ spatial resolution: take a picture  ­ temporal resolution: how well the technique pinpoints when the neural activity occurs Brain Trauma and Lesions ­ left frontal lobe (broca area) ­ left temporal lobe (wernickes area) ­ allow us to learn about the brain  Single and Double Dissociations ­ single: performance deficits in one task but no performance deficits in another task. ­ double: X deficit in reading, but not spoken language Y deficit in spoken language but  not reading. Provide evidence that any two processes are based on completely different  brain processes and structures. ­ argue the performance on two different experimental conditions. EEG ­ placed on scalp to pick up electrical current being conducted through the skull by the  activity of neurons underneath. ­ records a combo of activity of millions of neurons at the brains surface ­ good temporal resolution  ­ o
More Less

Related notes for PS260

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit