Class Notes (838,952)
Canada (511,158)
Psychology (2,794)
PS270 (136)
Lecture

Altruism.docx

5 Pages
60 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS270
Professor
Anne Wilson
Semester
Winter

Description
What Does It Mean to Be Altruistic? o Altruism: • The desire to help another person even if it involves no benefit, or even at a  cost, to the helper • A motive to increase another’s welfare without conscious regard for one’s  self­interests • A motive (to help others without concern for yourself) o Prosocial behaviour: • Any act performed with the goal of benefiting another person • Term sometimes preferred by social psychologists studying helping behaviour • An act  Theories of Why People Help: o Social norms: sociological • Social­responsibility: we may not be responsible for helping everyone, we are  responsible to help people in need (dependent, unable to do what we can) • Even though most of us agree that we have responsibility to help others, our  definition of who is in need can vary a lot (highlights attributions, attributions  of why people are in the situation they are in matters, more people will help  someone effected by a hurricane rather than someone on the streets on drugs) • Reciprocity: give and take (more likely to help those who help us) • We have no real reason to be helpful to people we interact with • These social norms are taught in different ways (depending on religion and  culture, the golden rule is taught in a different way, “thou shalt love thy  neighbour as thyself­Judaism”)  o Evolutionary: biological  • Premise: drive to reproduce our genes (anything that allows us to survive and  reproduce, are things that motivate us) • Kin selection: helping kin to survive and reproduce (kin share some of our  genes) • Can lead us to be selfish because we want to survive ourselves • If we have kin, we want to help them to survive and reproduce as it is another  way for our genes to continue to another generation  • More likely to help those who we share more genes with (help your  brother/sister over your first cousin) • If someone looks like us, it may be a cue that we share genes with that person  (when people look at strangers that share their characteristics, they are more  likely to feel that they can trust them and want to help that person)  • Reciprocal altruism: when it happens just with kin, you do not need to do  extra explaining (kinship is the reason), when not with kin, bats will  regurgitate their food to feed others in need (this happens because it helps the  survival of both bats as they feed each other when needed, the bats that don’t  reciprocate and give back, are less likely to get a favour the next time they get  hungry) • Is it really altruism if you expect a snack in return? o Social exchange theory: psychological • Does genuine altruism exist? • Costs vs. rewards • Minimax strategy: people engage in interactions that maximize their own  rewards and minimize their costs  • People will only help when the rewards of helping outweigh the costs of  helping • Maybe there is no true altruism after all (always looking for something back) • There are all different kinds of rewards (external such as cookies, approval,  respect or internal such as reducing your own distress or guilt) • People get a happiness boost when doing things for others • Egoism: a motive to increase one’s own welfare  Empathy and Altruism: o Empathy: the vicarious experience of another person’s feelings; focus on the  feeling of the other person rather than one’s own distress (if I know the person is  in pain, I feel that pain) o Empathy­altruism hypothesis: empathy leads to helping for purely altruistic  reasons, regardless of personal gains (when empathy is high, altruism in its pure  form exists and help is given regardless of rewards and costs, when empathy is  low and benefit outweighs the cost that is when they will be helped) o Sources of empathy: • Individual differences (which way you draw an E on your forehead effects  how you think about others) • Similarity (participants had a partner who either was very similar or distant,  when they felt similar to that person, they were more likely to offer to take the  shock themselves, felt empathy because they were similar to that person) • Closeness/vividness (when we experience someone’s pain vividly, the sense of  closeness increases and the more likely we are to feel empathy) • Mimicry: an effect of mimicry is an increase in empathy (trained people to  subtly mimic the participant, people who were mimicked felt more empathy  and were more likely to help them) The Bystander Effect: o Seminary student study: • Thought helping behaviour may be influenced by personal principles (strength  of connection to religion) and context • Brought people into the lab and told they were going to give a speech about  either being a good Samaritan from the bible or about jobs on campus  • Told them that they either have to rush or had a lot of time (different time  pressure) • Looked at what happened when people walked across campus and there was a  confederate lying on the ground looking distressed • Did not matter what the speech was about • Religiosity did not effect anything • The only thing that influenced helping the person on the floor was the context  of whether they felt rushed or had a lot of time  • The students who had to talk about being a good Samaritan and
More Less

Related notes for PS270

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit