Class Notes (835,658)
Canada (509,319)
Psychology (2,794)
PS270 (136)
Lecture

Close Relationships.docx

6 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PS270
Professor
Anne Wilson
Semester
Winter

Description
Happy vs. Unhappy Relationships: o Happy: • Life satisfaction • Self­regulation • Better coping o Unhappy/exclusion: • Depression • Self­defeating behaviour (substance abuse, risk taking behaviours) • Sense of meaninglessness  Should We Research Love? o Poets, writers, philosophers have sought to capture the meaning of love o Social psychology: love is an emotion, can be studies o Scientific study of love helps to contradict wrong theories (horoscopes) and  navigate its up and downs Initial Attraction: o Proximity: • Correlational studies: studies show people marry others who are nearby  • Friendships in the police academy: had groups of police recruits who came to  class, on the first day you didn’t know anyone and researcher would pay  attention to where everyone sat and looked at friendship formation, turned out  where you sit played a role in who you became friends with (became friends  with people who sat close to you than someone who sat at the other side of the  room) • Classic study: found people in residence became close to people on either side  of them rather than people on other floors  • Not physical distance but also functional distance (how often people’s paths  cross) matters  • Proximity matters because:  − Anticipatory liking: anticipating future interactions with someone will lead  us to like that person (knowing you are going to see that person every day  at the mailbox, you are going to want to like them) − Interaction: we like people more when we have the opportunity to interact  (there are some norms that lead us to not interact with people like on a bus  or subway) − Familiarity: we like things that we are familiar with, if something is  familiar it feels safer, we have an automatic positive reaction to things we  are familiar with, mere exposure effect (if we see something often, we are  more likely to like it, we have a preference for pictures, photos of  ourselves are unfamiliar to us because we never see ourselves, we only see  mirror images, more likely to select a reversed print of ourselves but true  print for others), implicit egotism and the name­letter effect (more likely  to like letters in our own names) o Physical attractiveness: • Hatfield dating study: sole determinant of desire to see dating partner again  were partner’s looks (randomly paired participants to the planned dance,  wanted to know who wanted to see their date again, the only thing  determining if they wanted another date was their attractiveness) • Effects evidence also in children and babies  • Beautiful people are perceived as happier, warmer, more outgoing, more  intelligent and more successful (known as the what is beautiful is good effect) • Some truth to stereotypes (attractive people are not happier but are more  successful) • Self­fulfilling prophecies (if we believe someone who is attractive is  intelligent, we treat them in a way for them to show their best qualities that we  expect of them)  • Who is attractive? Averageness is considered attractive, being symmetrical is  an indicator of good genes • Why do we like attractive faces? − Evolutionary theory: cues to health and reproductive success  − Stereotypes about attractive people (what is beautiful is good) − Easy processing (attractive faces are easier to process because they are  more symmetrical and average)  o Arousal: • Arousal is a central part of passionate love • Two factor theory of emotion: emotions are not always clear because they  often start off with basic arousal and then we need to label that arousal • Two factor theory of love: often call arousal love and attributing it to a  specific person  • Arousal can be misattributed  • More likely to be attracted to the researcher at the other end of a scary bridge  • Ariely and Lowenstein study: − Interested in the idea that we often assume our behaviours in the future (in  the morning you think you wont drink a lot but later in the night, your  state of mind is different)  − Arousal is a powerful disconnect between our predictions and our  behaviour (when we predict when we are not aroused are different than  when you are aroused) − Asked undergrad men questions when they were in their dorm unaroused  or on a computer while reading playboy magazines  − When not aroused, percentage of arousal was low, when aroused, the  percentage of participants saying yes increased  − Arousal increases our behaviour but not realized until aroused  o Reactance: • If someone is trying to influence you to do something you don’t want to do,  you will want to do the exact opposite  • Romeo and Juliet effect: greater parental interference associated with more  love (Romeo and Juliet were not allowed to be together and thus they wanted  to be together even more) • Does playing hard to get work? − Moderately selective partners are most liked (because you want to show  that you are selective but you are interested in them) − Highly selective partners seem conceited  − Do not want to seem too easily available but not too selective  • Closing time study: − Looked at people at a bar as closing time got closer and closer  − At 10:00, you may not be worried, at 11 you will be more concerned and  at midnight you will be more concerned − The more concerned you are, you become less selective  − Asked to rate the attractiveness of people of the same sex and opposite sex  in the bar  − When rating same sex people, ratings did not change much over the time − When rating people of the opposite sex increased through the night o How to increase chances of appearing attractive: • Proximity: be close to that person • Physical attractiveness: wear makeup • Increase arousal: go parachuting on a date • Reactance: be a little hard to get  Liking: o Similarity: • Hear that opposites attract and similarities attract  • Evidence shows that similarity leads to liking (not exactly 100% similar) • Ty
More Less

Related notes for PS270

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit