Class Notes (836,580)
Canada (509,856)
York University (35,328)
ADMS 2511 (179)
all (24)
Lecture

chapter_4 notes.docx

5 Pages
115 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 2511
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 4: Social, Ethical and Legal  Issues in the Digital Firm According to Canadian Alliance against Software Theft (CAAST) • Half of Canadians think pirate software is acceptable for individual use • ¾ think it’s unacceptable for organizations • 17  of 20 countries with lowest piracy rates (32%)  ▯still an issue • America is highest with 92% 4.1 Understanding Social, Legal and Ethical Issues Related to Systems • Ethical  ▯principles of right and wrong that individuals, acting as free moral agents, use to make choices to  guide their behaviours • IT can be used to commit crime o Ethical issues in IS  due to rise of e­commerce o Appropriate use of customer information, personal privacy, protection of intellectual capital Five Moral Dimensions of the Information Age 1. Information rights and obligations 2. Property rights and obligations  ▯intellectual property 3. Accountability and control  ▯who will be held responsible? 4. System quality (standards) 5. Quality of life Key Technology Trends That Raise Ethical Issues • Computing power doubles every 18 months o More organizations depend on computer systems for critical operations • Data storage costs rapidly declining o Organizations can easily maintain detailed databases on individuals • Data analysis advances o Companies can analyze large quantities of data and generate detailed profiles of individual  behaviour o E.g. DoubleClick tracks user activities and sells them to companies, ChoicePoint gathers  information for employee background checks (e.g. police/motor vehicle record, credit &  employment history) o Nonobvious relationship awareness (NORA): data analysis technology that can take info about  people from many disparate sources, such as employment applications, telephone records etc. to  find obscure hidden connections that might help identify criminals or terrorists • Networking advances and the Internet o Copying & accessing personal data are much easier 4.2 Ethics in an Information Society Basic Concepts • Responsibility: accept potential costs, duties and obligations for decisions • Accountability: mechanisms in place to determine who took responsible action and who is responsible o Systems and institutions that fail at this stage are incapable of ethical analysis or ethical action • Liability: permits individuals to recover damages done to them by other actors, systems or organizations • Underpinning of ethical analysis of IS and those who manage them 1. IT is filtered through social institutions, organizations and individuals and are products of such 2. Responsibility clearly falls on social institutions, organizations and individuals 3. In an ethical, political society, individuals and others can recover damages done to them through a set  of laws characterised by due process Ethical Analysis 1. Identify and describe the facts clearly (WWWWWH) 2. Define conflict or dilemma, and identify the higher order values (ethical, social, political) involved 3. Identify the stakeholders 4. Identify the options you can reasonably take 5. Identify the potential consequences of your option Candidate Ethical Principles 1. Golden Rule: do unto others as you would them do unto you 2. Immanuel Kant’s categorical imperative: If an action is not right for everyone to take, it’s not right for  anyone 3. Descartes’ rule of change: if an action cannot be taken repeatedly, it’s not right to take at all 4. Utilitarian principle: take the action that achieves the highest or greatest value 5. Risk aversion principle: take the action that produces the least harm or the least potential cost 6. Ethical “no free lunch” rule: assume that virtually all tangible and intangible objects are owned by  someone else unless there is a specific declaration otherwise Professional Codes of Conduct • Group of people claim to be professionals o Take on special rights and obligations because of their special claims to knowledge, wisdom and  respect 4.3 The Moral Dimensions of Information Systems (1) Information Rights: Privacy and Freedom in the Internet Age • Privacy: claim of individuals to be left alone, free from surveillance or interference from other individuals  or organizations include state • Organizations established to address issue o Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) o Canadian Standards Association’s Modern Privacy Code  Accountability  Identifying purposes  Consent  Limited collection  Limited use, disclosure and retention  Accuracy  Safeguards  Openness  Individual access  Challenging compliance • Fair Information Practices (FIP): set of principles governing the collection and use of information ab
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 2511

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit