Class Notes (837,538)
Canada (510,303)
York University (35,409)
ADMS 3530 (82)
all (20)
Lecture

lecture_2 notes.docx

4 Pages
65 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 3530
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Finance ADMS 3530 ­ Winter 2012 – Professor Lois King Lecture 2 – Time Value of Money (Part ½) – Jan 10 2.1 Intro to Time Value of Money − The idea that money invested today has more value than money invested later.  − Time value of money (TVM) is the most important concept in this course.  − Most financial decisions (whether personal or corporate) require comparisons of cash  payments at different points in time.  − To make optimal decisions, you must understand the relationship between a dollar today  [Present value] and a dollar in the future [Future value]. 2.2 Single Cash Flow − Future value – of ‘FV’, is the amount to which an investment will grow after earning  interest.  − Interest can be calculated in two ways: o Simple interest.  o Compound interest.  − Simple interest – Interest earned only on the original investment.  − Compound interest – Interest is earned on both the original investment and any prior  period’s interest.  2.2 FV of a Single Cash Flow − Future value using simple interest o FV = PV+(PV*r*n) − Future value using compound interest o FV = PV*(1+r) n − In this course, we will almost always be dealing with compound interest calculations. − Using your calculator to find FV: o Make sure it is in financial mode.  o Input the following variables:  1000  ▯PV  4  ▯n  10  ▯i  COMP FV o You should get ­$1464 as your answer!   Note: you will get a negative amount as your calculator is trying to  distinguish between cash inflows and outflows.  − In summary, there are 3 ways to find the FV of a single cash flow (assuming compound  interest): o Calculate the ending value of each year separately.  o Use the FV formula. o Use your calculator. 2.2 PV of a Single Cash Flow − Recall the FV formula (using compound interest): n o FV = PV*(1+r) − If we flip this equation around, we can find PV (present value): o PV = FV*1/(1+r) n  Where 1/(1+r)  is called the present value factor (PVIF) or the discount  factor.   And finding the PV is also called discounting.  − Example #1 o If you invest $100 for one year at 6%, find the future value of this cash flow.  o Solution:  n 1  Using our FV formula: FV = PV*(1+r)   ▯=100*(1+.06)  = $106 − Example #2 o How much would you have to invest today if you require $106 in one year and the  interest rate is 6%? o Solution:  Using our PV formula: PV = FV*1/(1+r)   ▯=106*1/(1+.06)  = $100 2.2 Rules for TVM Problems −  Today  is time zero i.0. t ,1not t − You must bring all cash flows to a common date before comparing them.  − Drawing a time line is always helpful.  2.2 PV of a Single Cash Flow − Alternative solution  ▯using your calculator to find PV: o Make sure it is in financial mode. o Input the following variables:
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 3530

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit