Class Notes (834,049)
Canada (508,296)
York University (35,141)
ADMS 3531 (30)
all (27)
Lecture

adms3531_-_lecture_3_-_pa.docx

4 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 3531
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Personal Investment Management ADMS 3531 ­ Fall 2011 – Professor Dale Domian Lecture 3, Part 1 – The Stock Market – Sept 27 Chapter Six Outline ­ The primary and secondary stock markets.  ­ The New York Stock Exchange. ­ The Toronto Stock Exchange and TSX Venture Exchange. ­ Nasdaq ­ Third and Fourth Market.  ­ Stock Market Information. The Stock Market ­ ‘Big picture’ overview of: o Who owns stocks.  o How a stock exchange works, and o How to read and understand the stock market information reported in the financial  press. The Primary Stock Markets ­ The primary market is the market where investors purchase newly issued securities.  o Initial public offering (IPO) – An initial public offer occurs when a company  offers stock for sale to the public for the first time. The Secondary Stock Markets ­ The secondary market is the market where investor’s trade previously issued securities.  An investor can trade: o Directly with other investors.  o Indirectly through a broker who arranges transactions for others.  o Directly with a dealer who buys and sells securities from inventory. The Primary Market for Common Stock ­ An IPO involves several steps. Company appoints investment banking firm to arrange  financing.  o Investment banker designs the stock issue and arranges for fixed commitment or  best effort underwriting.  o Company prepares a prospectus (usually with outside help) and submits it to  securities and exchange commissions for approval. o Investment banker circulates preliminary prospectus (red herring). ­ Upon obtaining approval, company finalizes prospectus. ­ Underwriters place announcements (tombstones) in newspapers and begin selling shares. The Secondary Market ­ The bid price: o The price dealers pay investors. ­ The ask price: o The price dealers receive from investors. ­ The difference between the bid and ask prices is called the bid­ask spread, or simply  spread. ­ Most common stock trading is directed through an organized stock exchange or trading  network.  ­ Whether a stock exchange or trading network, the goal is to match investors wishing to  buy stocks with investors wishing to sell stocks. The New York Stock Exchange ­ The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), popularly known as the Big Board, celebrated  its bicentennial in 1992.  ­ The NYSE has occupied its current building on Wall Street since the turn of the century. ­ The NYSE has 1,366 exchange members. NYSE­Listed Stocks ­ In 2003, stocks from about 2,800 companies were listed, with a collective market value  of about $15 trillion. ­ An initial listing fee, as well as annual listing fees, is charged based on the number of  shares. ­ In 2003, the average stock trading volume on the NYSE was just over 1 billion shares a  day. The Toronto Stock Exchange ­ The Toronto Stock Exchange started its operations in 1861 with 18 securities and 14  member firms.  ­ The initial members paid $250 to purchase a seat at that time. In 1901, the price of a  membership rose to $12,000 and trading volume became approximately 1 million shares  per year. ­ To be listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, technology companies must have at least  one million free shares with total market value of $4 million or $10 million. These shares  must be held by at least 300 public shareholders. ­ In 1999, the Canadian
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 3531

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit