Class Notes (836,220)
Canada (509,694)
York University (35,328)
ADMS 4520 (34)
all (22)
Lecture

adms4520_-_lecture_3_-_ch.docx

5 Pages
139 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 4520
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Advanced Financial Accounting I ADMS 4520 – Winter 2012 – Patrice Gelinas Lecture 3 – Consolidated Statements on Date of Acquisition – Jan 20 Consolidated Financial Statements ­ IAS 27 specified the accounting principles involved in the preparation of consolidated  financial statements. ­ Consolidated financial statements consist of a balance sheet, a statement of  comprehensive income, a statement of changes in equity, a cash flow statement, and the  accompanying notes ­ We will now focus on the preparation of the consolidated balance sheet on the date that  control is obtained by the parent company, using the acquisition method Consolidated Balance Sheet on Acquisition Date ­ Working Paper Approach – Use of the working paper ensures that the debit and credit  adjustments balance each other. ­ Push­down accounting o Not permitted under IFRS but may be in the future.  Permitted by GAAP for  private enterprises, with disclosures required in the first year of application o Under CICA Handbook Section 1625 push­down accounting was permitted when  the parent owned 90% or more of a subsidiary.  In these cases the parent could  revalue the subsidiary’s assets and liabilities based on the parent’s acquisition  cost, simplifying the process of preparing consolidated financial statements ­ Subsidiary formed by parent o When a parent company starts a subsidiary, the preparation of the consolidated  balance sheet on the date of formation of the subsidiary requires only the  elimination of the parent’s investment against the subsidiary’s share capital since  the subsidiary would have no retained earnings on formation ­ Negative goodwill o The parent company gains control of subsidiary’s assets and liabilities at a price  that is less than the fair values assigned to those assets and liabilities  Often described as a bargain purchase, this can occur when share prices  are depressed or subsidiary has had recent operating losses o IFRS 3 requires that negative goodwill be reduced to zero by first reducing any  goodwill on the subsidiary’s books, then recognizing any remaining negative  goodwill as a gain ­ Negative acquisition differential: o Could result in negative goodwill if the fair values of the subsidiary’s net assets  also exceed acquisition cost, otherwise will result in positive goodwill o Results when the parent’s interest in the book values of the subsidiary’s net assets  exceed acquisition cost o Not the same as negative goodwill ­ Subsidiary with goodwill: o Any goodwill on balance sheet of subsidiary on acquisition date is not carried  forward to the consolidated balance sheet o That goodwill resulted from a past transaction in which the subsidiary was the  acquirer in a business combination, reflecting outdated fair values of the entity it  acquired o The parent’s acquisition differential is now calculated as if the goodwill had been  written off by the subsidiary and replaced instead by the updated fair values and  goodwill of the entity the subsidiary previously acquired ­ Consolidation of non­wholly owned subsidiaries: o The shares not owned by the parent are owned by the other shareholders, referred  to as the “non­controlling shareholders”. o The value of shares held by the non­controlling shareholders appears on the  balance sheet as “non­controlling interest” (NCI). o Four theories address the following questions:  How should the portion of the subsidiary’s net assets not owned by the  parent be valued on the consolidated financial statements?  How should NCI be valued?  How should NCI be presented? Consolidation on Acquisition Date ­ Income statement in year of acquisition. o Under the acquisition method, only the net income earned by the subsidiary after  the date of acquisition is included in consolidated net income.  In the above  example, P’s financial statements for June 30, Year 1 would include a  consolidated balance sheet and net income, changes in equity, and cash flows  from P’s separate entity financial statements Conceptual Alternatives ­ The four theories are: o Proprietary Theory o Entity Theory o Parent Company Theory o Parent Company Extension ­ Parent Company Theory was GAAP in Canada to January 1, 2011 or sooner upon earlier  adoption of IFRS 3 ­ On January 1, 2011 the Entity Theory replaces Parent Company Theory as the preferred  method of consolidating subsidiaries ­ The Parent Company Extension Theory is also acceptable after January 1, 2011 or sooner ­ Proprietary Theory is presently used for consolidating joint ventures but may be  discontinued soon The Proprietary Theory ­ Views the consolidated entity from the standpoint of the shareholders of the parent  company ­ Therefore the consolidated statements do not reflect the equity of the non­controlling  shareholders ­ Not permitted under GAAP for consolidation of parent and subsidiary, however is used to  report joint venture investments where there is no control relationship ­ The consolidated balance sheet consists of the historical values of the parent’s assets and  liabilities plus the parent’s share of the fair values of the subsidi
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 4520

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit