Class Notes (836,380)
Canada (509,761)
York University (35,328)
ADMS 4520 (34)
all (22)
Lecture

lecture_2 notes.docx

8 Pages
142 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Administrative Studies
Course
ADMS 4520
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Winter

Description
Advanced Financial Accounting I ADMS 4520 – Winter 2012 – Patrice Gelinas Lecture 2 – Business Combinations – Jan 13 Introduction ­ A business combination occurs when one company unites with or obtains control of  another company. ­ The ‘parent’ is the controlling company and the ‘subsidiary’ is the controlled company. ­ Consolidated financial statements are required to report the combined financial position  and results of operations of the parent and the subsidiary.  ­ Control over another company can be obtained by (i) purchasing substantially all of its  net assets, or (ii) acquiring enough of the company’s voting shares to control the use of its  net assets.  ­ A conglomerate business combination involves regular businesses operating in widely  different industries.  ­ A horizontal business combination involves businesses whose products are similar.  ­ A vertical business combination involves businesses where the output from one can be  used as input from the other. Business Combinations ­ Business combinations (‘takeovers’, ‘amalgamations’, ‘acquisitions’ or ‘mergers’) can be  friendly or hostile. ­ In a friendly combination, management and the board of directors of both companies  recommend that their shareholders approve the combination proposal.  ­ In a hostile combination the management and board of the target company recommends  that its shareholders reject the combination proposal, and may employ various defences. ­ Payment for net assets or shares acquired can be in cash, promises to pay cash in the  future, or the issuance of shares, or a combination of these. ­ The method of payment has a direct bearing on the determination of which company is  the acquirer and which is being acquired. Forms of Business Combinations ­ Purchase of Assets – Control over another company’s assets can be obtained by  purchasing the assets outright, leaving the selling company only with the consideration  received for the asset sale and any liabilities present before the sale.  ­ Purchase of Shares – An alternative to the purchase of assets is for the acquirer to  purchase enough voting shares from the shareholders of the acquire that it can determine  the acquiree’s strategic operating, investing, and financial policies. o Share purchase can be less costly since control can be achieved by purchasing less  than 100% of the voting shares. Share purchases can also have important income  tax advantages. ­ Both forms of business combination result in the assets and liabilities of the acquiree  being combined with those of the acquirer.  ­ If control is achieved with the purchase of net assets, the combining takes place in the  accounting records of the acquiree.  ­ If control is achieved by purchasing shares, the combining takes place when the  consolidated financial statements are prepared. Methods of Accounting for Business Combinations ­ There are four methods that have been used in practice or discussed in theory over the  years: o The purchase method. o The acquisition method.  o The pooling­of­interests method. o The new entity method. ­ The purchase method is required GAAP prior to adoption of the acquisition method  which must be adopted on or before January 1, 2011. ­ The pooling­of­interest method was acceptable in limited situations prior to July 1, 2001  and can no longer be used. ­ The new entity method has never been acceptable for GAAP but is worthy of future  consideration. The Purchase Method ­ Under the purchase method prior to 2011 or earlier adoption of IFRS 3, the acquiring  company recorded the net assets of the acquired company in its investment account at the  price it paid. ­ Price includes cash payments, FMV of shares issued, and PV of any future cash payments  promised. ­ Excess of price paid over the fair value of the acquired company’s net assets are recorded  as goodwill. ­ The fair values of identifiable net assets acquired were charged against earnings  (amortized) to achieve expense matching. ­ Goodwill was regularly reviewed for impairment and impairment losses were recorded as  a charge against earnings.  ­ The purchase method is consistent with historical cost principle of accounting – record  the price paid for the net assets and amortizes the cost over their useful lives. The Acquisition Method ­ After January 1, 2011 or upon earlier adoption of IFRS 3, the acquiring company will use  the acquisition method. ­ The acquiring company records the identifiable net assets at fair values regardless of  price paid. ­ If purchase price is > FV of identifiable net assets the excess is reported as goodwill  similar to purchase method. ­ If price paid is 
More Less

Related notes for ADMS 4520

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit