The After Shocks of War Discusses the various strains the war had upon the veterans mentally and government financially and how they dealt with it.

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Published on 16 Oct 2011
School
York University
Department
History
Course
HIST 2500
Page:
of 5
The After Shocks of War
The war in art and literature
Becomes an age when an increasing amount of people read (newspapers,
letters and books)
oThe content expresses the hardships of war in respect to suffering and
death (literature/art; is a form of remembrance)
oAll quite on the western front (famous German novel)
Erich Maria Remarque
Lieutenant John McCrae (is known for Flander’s field poem )
o60,000 Canadian’s bodies aren’t returned; becomes a problem for
families (because of religious purposes; mourning)
Is a problem, for the bodies are unknown
oBecomes a reminder of the amount of men and women who die in the
war
Leslie Coulson
Horace Mann
oWrites about German and Canadian soldiers
Wilfred Owen
oDies a week before the war’s end (1918); spends time in a mental
ward.
A New Conjuncture
Number of wounded
Nature of their wounds
Reception of veterans after war
Government provision for them
Political and economic consequences
War memorials
48th Highlands (1923) and City Hall (1924)
Kingston/Danforth (1921); Kolkwitz (Hamburg)
oDeals with the people who are left behind (consists of two people
mourning)
Kathe Kollwitz: Muetter, 1919
oIllustrates the sense of the war (reflects unity and abandonment; of
women following the war)
Were made to respect/represent the soldiers sacrifices
oThey don’t celebrate heroism, but rather represent a tomb stone (this
is seen through their simply nature; statues)
After the War: Veterans
Veterans pensions
oAre examined by a medical board; this creates a standardization to
receive a pension
For dependents
For disabled soldiers
About 125,000 wounded in war: mostly in extremities
The Numbers: Dec. 1920, 177,035 men, women and children are supported
by pension; number would grow
oSome men are later compensated because of their dependence
(children and families growth) and disorders (injures which come into
affect later on in life)
The Mentally Wounded
Constant barrage
oAre evaluate and considered to disabled (end up in mental institutions)
Conditions in trenches
Exposed to horrific sites
Early part of war kept men at Front
Battle of Somme June to Nov. 1916
Battle of Passchendaele July to Nov. 1917
Veterans Organizations
Various organizations during and after war
oBecome permanent establishments
Canadian Legion 1927
oIs based on the American legion in 1926; is just for veterans and
eventually their family members
Consists of more than 100,000 members and 594 branches
Making Transition to Civilian Life
Retraining: by Dec. 1919, 27,602 men
oGovernment provides provision for training/schooling individuals
Life insurance
Government jobs for handicapped
oBecomes a way of rewarding veterans (patronage system)
Interest free loans
oProvided for men and their families to buy land and capital equipment
(particularly in western Canada)
Soldier Settlement Act of 1917
The Financial Cost
Revenue: tariffs and bonds
Victory Bonds
Income Tax: 25 July 1917
4% tax on corporate profits
4% on personal income
Graduated tax on those making more than $6,000.

Document Summary

Lieutenant john mccrae (is known for flander"s field poem : 60,000 canadian"s bodies aren"t returned; becomes a problem for families (because of religious purposes; mourning) Is a problem, for the bodies are unknown: becomes a reminder of the amount of men and women who die in the war. Leslie coulson: horace mann, writes about german and canadian soldiers, wilfred owen, dies a week before the war"s end (1918); spends time in a mental ward. A new conjuncture: number of wounded, nature of their wounds, reception of veterans after war, government provision for them, political and economic consequences. After the war: veterans: veterans pensions, are examined by a medical board; this creates a standardization to receive a pension. Making transition to civilian life: retraining: by dec. 1919, 27,602 men, government provides provision for training/schooling individuals. Life insurance: government jobs for handicapped, becomes a way of rewarding veterans (patronage system)