Class Notes (835,926)
Canada (509,504)
York University (35,286)
History (957)
HIST 2500 (93)
Lecture

Feb.13_Macphail and Demerson.docx

9 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 2500
Professor
William Wicken
Semester
Winter

Description
February 13 , 2014 HIST 2500 – Lecture Agnes Macphail and Velma Demerson  Agnes Macphail first woman to be elected as member of parliament in the House of  Commons (1921 general election)   Velma Demerson represents dysfunction; comes from a divorced family, becomes  involved with a Chinese man, common­law relationship  Population of Major Cities, 1891­1921 - Most popular cities: Montreal and Toronto - Steel industry in Hamilton leads to population growth  - Halifax growing at a very slow rate Vaughan/St. Clair: 1912 - Picture of intersection in the past vs. present day - Profound difference Bay/Gerard: 1928 - Church no longer exists - Most parts of downtown have been restructured, renovated, rebuilt Estimated Crude Birth Rate: Canada - Immigration most important promoter of population change during time period - 1861­1921: crude birth rate declines - Various factors - Does not necessarily mean fertility rate is declining - Difference: crude birth rate doesn’t take into account people’s age (women btw ages of  25 to 29 have more children than other age groups in this time period) – child/women  ratio - Fertility rate: # of children born in any calendar year over the # of women over fertile age  – this lets us determine whether there is a decline in the # of children born to women - Allows us to determine how many immigrants should enter the country - Child/Women ratio in 1901 low in Ontario  - One of the factors which will effect crude birth rate is average life expectancy Average Life Expectancy: Canada -  Increasing among all members of the population (males: 41.4  ▯63.0; females: 43.7  ▯ 66.3) - Average life expectancy btw men and women increases during this time period Urban and Social Reform - Comes out of the church in the late 19  and early 20  century - The bible is placed within human knowledge - Important figures: Woodsworth, Douglas - CCF will be established in 1932 - Both preachers/pastors during their early years - Representative of this change in the political spectrum - Church leaders move away from the church and into the political spectrum to begin  advocating change Agnes Macphail - Born in rural Ontario in 1890 - Educated at normal school - Between 1911 and 1920 teaches in rural Ontario and Alberta - Became associated with United Farmers of Ontario and Alberta - Had lasting impact in Canadian politics  - Creation of third party – 1921 – minority gov’t is elected at federal election** - Party did not believe in elitism, old political way of doing things; reflected sovereignty of  the people o Sovereignty of local electors and nominating candidates  o Directing local campaign vs. taking orders from national party o Forcing candidate to sign notice of recall (i.e. in an emergency situation, when the  electors disagreed with an idea, they were forced to recall) o ??? - More sovereignty and control of local people over actions/controls of their sitting MP - Opposition parties began having an impact   - Wins re­election as Progressive Party candidate in 1925, 1926, and 1930 - Runs as UFO/Labour candidate in 1935 and 1940 - Loses 1940 election - Turns towards provincial politics, working with CCF Prime Ministers of Canada - After the war, the Union Coalition (liberals/conservatives) continue in power until 1920,  split off and reform themselves  - Arthur Meighen becomes leader of Conservative party, Mackenzie King becomes leader  of Liberal party The Progressive Party of Canada, Genesis of the Progressives - Division was important because division between French Canada and English Canada - 1891 and 1911: Liberals ran free trade with the U.S. - Lower tariffs and free trade favoured by farmers - Growth of Prairies and discontent  - They begin to denounce liberals and conservatives for their high tariff policy - Farmers begin organizing principally in Western Canada - United Farmers of Ontario win 1919 election - Running on policy of convincing federal government to lower tariffs  - They propose coalition of parties that run the government   - Henry Wise Wood and United Farmers of Alberta: ‘class interests’ - Advocating radical idea - Representation by social class 1921 Federal Election - Liberals won a minority - Conservatives devastated, do not elect members in six provinces - Progressive results are surprising - During this time, you find that many ideas form the foundation of the reform party and  eventually the conservative party  Consequences of Reform and Political Change - War is one of the most transformative events in human history o WWI in which Canada is involved for 51 months, leads to more than 600,000  men and 3,000 women (nurses) participating in this Canadian expeditionary force  o On the home front, people are also pulled together/apart – told and participate to  support their men overseas – raise money – this war is perceived as sacrifice and  loss  o By 1916, the number of enlistments is constantly declining – regarded as  senseless war in which everyone has suffered o People are bereaved, in national sorrow   o Now they react in a way which is quite transformative in terms of Canadian  politics o United people in a way that never happened before because nothing like this had  ever happened in Canadian history  - Growth of Western Canada: livelihood affected by high tariffs  o A lot of criticism of Canadian Wheat Board, railways, seemed to reflect business  interests of Canada o Farmers came together to combat these competing interests - Depression following the war – 1919­1922­1932
More Less

Related notes for HIST 2500

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit