Class Notes (836,658)
Canada (509,870)
York University (35,328)
History (957)
HIST 3580 (10)
Lecture

Feb 13 - Lecture.docx

5 Pages
100 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 3580
Professor
Dan Azoulay
Semester
Winter

Description
20  Century Canada Lecture – February 13 , 2014 The Turbulent Sixties: Politics, Canada­U.S Relations, and Canadian Culture • Ongoing evolution of Canada’s welfare state • Welfare state was born in the 1940s and despite a weaker government  commitment to the welfare state in immediate postwar years, the welfare state  continued to evolve under Diefenbaker and St. Laurent government • Flourished in the 1960s at a time when Canadians were divided  • The welfare state was one of the few subjects with a broad consensus • Pearson gov said they would act on their promises if elected • Once in power, they actually delivered on their promises • Pumped money into college and university • Education was important to compete with the soviet union • Money was pumped into technical schools and retraining programs • Money into construction of high schools and post secondary • Through Canada Assistance Plan, government provided money to provinces for  social welfare services • More money was spent on the poor as a result of all this • Generosity of federal government also made medicare a reality • 1966 government offered to share the cost of universal medical insurance • now all Canadians had affordable medical insurance • 1966 government introduced the CPP (pension plan) • the feds poured tons of money into social programs in the 1960s • the reasons they did all this was because the 1960s was an idealistic decade • canadians were more concerned for fighting against social and economic equality • government was responding to the idealistic mood • national unity was starting to weaken by the 1960s • strong anti communist consensus began to disintegrate by this time as well • Quebec nationalist movement was getting stronger • Government saw shared programs as a way to restore national unity • Deficit and debt were not a huge part of the governments lexicon • There was lots of money so government could be generous • Canadians didn’t seem to care about the old parties that ran the welfare state  (conservatives or liberals) Despicable Behaviour of Politicians • Politics have never been so debased as they were in the 60s • In these years it was common for both parties to resort to dirty tactics of all sorts • Name­calling, innuendo, rumor mongering, deception, etc. • It all started during diefenabakers time in office • He was portrayed as a liar and indecisive bumbling fool • In one election campaign, the liberals distributed a colouring book with  Diefenbaker on a rocking horse • Liberals had strongly criticized his government for mismanaging the economy  and damaging US relations • This behavior became more common when tories became official opposition in  1963 • Tories favourite tactic to make liberals look bad was to accuse them of scandalous  behavior • The liberals seemed more than willing to comply • Known to accept bribes from business people Munsinger Affair • Tories had recently discovered that an elderly postal clerk, George spencer was a  Russian spy • They fired him and didn’t charge • Diefenabker saw this as an opp to attack government and destroy minister of  justice • Liberals were tired of scandal mongering tories were doing • Minister of justice opened a can of worms known as munsinger affair • He accused several of diefenbakers former cabinet ministers of sleeping with a  german prostitute named gurda munsinger who was also a spy • He asserted that Diefenbaker ignored this security breach • Liberals knew about this for a long time, but waited to play the card • Reporters tracked her down and revealed the name of one of the ministers • P Sevigny was the name and he admitted it • Liberals argued the tories were guilty of a security breach • They didn’t prove that munsinger was a spy or tried to blackmail Sevigny • Instead of attacking government on policy issues, they attacked on personal New Flag • Diefenbaker stirred up emotion when he accused Pearson for making a new flag  to appease the Quebec Nationalists • Measure of desperation shown through all the scandals • The parties couldn’t form a majority government because they weren’t getting  enough votes Canadian American Relations: the deep­freeze • Relations deteriorated badly in these years • Surprising development because 1940s and 50s relationship was good • Concern that our growing dependence on US was restricting our independence in  world affairs • We still believed that the main objective of American foreign policy to stop  communism was good and that we could still maintain independence in foreign  affairs by offsetting US pressure through NATO and UN, etc. •
More Less

Related notes for HIST 3580

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit