Class Notes (835,600)
Canada (509,275)
York University (35,236)
History (957)
HIST 3580 (10)
Lecture

March 20 - Lecture.docx

4 Pages
38 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 3580
Professor
Dan Azoulay
Semester
Winter

Description
20  Century Canada Lecture – March 20 , 2014h The Age of Empowerment, 1970­ 1995 Introduction • High level of social activism in Canada • Quebec nationalists, youth, and a variety of groups • Canadian blacks found inspiration in American black civil rights movement • Homosexuals wanted decriminalization of homosexuality from criminal code • Womens movement and aboriginal movement • Changed political agenda of Canadian government • Years after wwii governments were focused on economic growth and welfare  state • Emergence of feminism and aboriginal protest, politicians were forced to address  other issues like social and legal equality • This changed Canada fundamentally Second wave feminism • By the 1960s, status of women was not great • Held a subordinate status • Most Canadian women were housewives and mothers • It was assumed to be their principle role • Discouraged from pursuing careers or holding down a regular job especially if  they had kids • Working mothers were accused of neglecting their kids and threatening husbands  masculinity • In 1960, only 1/7 mothers worked outside their homes • Women who did work continued to face discrimination in the workplace • All the best jobs went to men, while women ended up with menial low paying  jobs • In 1960, women held 62% of all clerical positions • This segregation was a result of a sexist upbringing or socialization process where  girls were taught in their homes and schools to expect nothing more out of life • Girls internalized these assumptions, and never thought of themselves as doctors  or lawyers or business managers • But discrimination was definitely a factor, most employers didn’t think women  could handle more difficult jobs or were only biologically suited to different jobs • Mothers faced additional discrimination • It was widely believed mothers should be at home with their kids, so employers  wouldn’t hire them or would fire them once they got pregnant • Also experienced salary discrimination • Paid 1/3 less for the same work that men did • All of these problems were magnified for immigrant women or visible minorities • Segregated in universities as well • Adults discouraged women from enrolling in masculine programs • Some universities still had quotas on the number of women they allowed into  such programs • Canaidna women held subordinate position in public life and politics • Some gains were made in the 1950s, when they persuaded governments to allow  women in government commissions and jobs • Such appointments were few and far between • Women were not elected to public office often • In 1960 there were only 2 female MPs and 1 cabinet minister • Faced legal discrimination as well • In quebec women were treated as minors under the law • Not allowed to sit on juries • Could not rent apartments on their own (father or husband had to sign lease) • Couldn’t open a bank account • Treated like dependents when it came to property law • If a woman divorced her husband, there was no guarantee that she would share  equally the assets they accumulated • They did not have the legal right to control their own reproduction • Contraception and birth control info was still illegal • Pharmasists and social workers were fined • Abortion was illegal as well • A lot of unwanted pregnancy was a result • Followed by desperate women by inducing abortion • By 1960s 1/5 women who died while giving birth did so as a result of illegal  abortions • Despite the fact that they had proven themselves during wwii, still treated as  second class citizens • Some womens groups did fight for change • National council of women • Pressured governments to introduce equal pay laws and appoint more women to  government posts • Small gains were made • Voice of Women (VOW) became leading voice in early anti­war and anti­nuclear  movement  • Responsible for diefenbakers decision for not accepting nuclear weapons in canad • This group
More Less

Related notes for HIST 3580

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit