Class Notes (835,428)
Canada (509,186)
York University (35,236)
History (957)
HIST 3850 (105)
Lecture 8

Lecture 8 - Law of Insanity.docx

6 Pages
131 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 3850
Professor
Patrick J Connor
Semester
Fall

Description
HIST3850 Patrick Connor November 9, 2012 Lecture #8: The Law of Insanity • “Under what circumstances should judges and juries, when confronted with a  defendant who is said to be mentally ill, turn this individual over, from the  criminal justice system, to the mental health system?”  • Study by corrections Canada said 12% of male candidates and 21% of female are  identified as having a serious mental health disorder when they enter the penal  system • No rates on when they leave system Three Cases that used Insanity Defense: • Daniel M’Naughton (1843) • Charles Guiteay (1881) • Valentine Shortis (1896) Insanity • Goes back to ancient Greeks • Mentioned in Plato • Don’t offer terms in legal approach but philosophical • Distinguished man from animals by virtue of fact that human beings are beings of  reason • Recognized place of reason within legal codes • Laws could only apply to those able to understand them • The reach of law only extend to those who could comprehend terms and abide by  subscriptions • Those who didn’t understand legally treated like children, expected to stay at  home • Ancients believed insane should be excluded from law and society • Violence in pre­industrial times was collected family business • Understood as a member of family killing someone else • Family expected to keep insane members in check/control • With fall of Roman Empire (400 AD) all knowledge essentially lost • Medieval Europeans recognized some illnesses with organic causation • Difficult to distinguish between physical and psychological factors • Demons and possession • Witchcraft o Witches not considered victims o Witchcraft trials, called on to examine accused and to provide extra  opinion to court about their psyche to court o Not to spare accused or defend innocence Sir Edward Coke (1552­1634) • There are “those who sometimes had understanding, and sometimes did not” • Such state might be the result of birth, or a later condition brought about by illness  or an accident • But, ability to plan and carry out a crime in itself shows a defendant was not  insane for the purposes of law Sir Mathew Hale (1609­1676) • Proposed a very absolutist view of criminal responsibility • To be judged insane, one had to be entirely lacking in reason • One state th mind indistinguishable from “infant, brute or wild beast” • Part of 17  century “common sense” view of criminal insanity: o British courts went a long way toward “demystifying” insanity o Provided procedural safeguards for those judges to have been insane at the  time of their alleged crime, even in cases of treason • One thing that neither Hale nor any of his contemporaries found necessary to  include was the provision of medical specialists to inform or guide the jury in  such cases Daniel M’Naughton • Middle of London, England State  • 1843, January 20 th • Shoots Edmund Drummond • Drummond was a private secretary to the Prime Minister • Assassin walked close up to Drummond, showing determination not to fail  actually put muzzle of pistol into back of unsuspecting gentlemen and fired • Policeman saw act, rushed and seized criminal • Lodged in his lower left side • Missed any major arteries • Following morning, Drummond experienced difficulty breathing • Rib had shattered and wound had become infected • In 1840’s could be a death sentence  • Attempt to deal with situation, drew blood from temple artery and applied blood  sucking leeches to patient • Dies from his would 4 days later  • Shooter immediately arrested and taken to police station where questioned • Refused to answer questions • Comfortable financial status • Found percussion caps in his apartments which fitted the gun used • Police discovered witnesses who claimed to have seen him around White Hall  (where government located) • Newspapers reported that not any evidence of insanity • Brought in front of magistrate to be formally charged • Arresting officer heard him say “he shall not destroy my peace of mind any  longer” • Only statement he ever made: “The Tories in my native city…”  • Asked if he knew identity of man he shot • Seemed surprised and said “its sir Robert penal is it not” • Case of mistaken identity • Trial began on March 3, 1843 six weeks after shooting • When asked to enter plea, M’Naughton silent • Replied he was driven to desperation by persecution • Guilty of shooting but not rest so pleased not guilty • Prosecution anticipated insanity defense • Began case by telling jury that legal question would turn on state of mind • If you believe that he fired pistol, incapable of distinguishing between right and  wrong… (Look at slide for rest of quotes) • Defense led by Alexander Cockburn • Agreed he did shoot • But, we must understand defendant’s state of mind at the time he committed the  offense • Such an understanding must be based on modern medical science • Madness is a disease of the body operated by the mind • Jury informed that according to most modern medical thinking, brain composed  of two separate parts: intellect and emotion • One part of brain can be diseased while rest remain healthy • Would make victim subject to most fearful delusions •
More Less

Related notes for HIST 3850

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit