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Lecture 12

Lecture 12.docx

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Department
Humanities
Course Code
HUMA 1710
Professor
Carol Bigwood

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Lecture 12 1/9/2012 4:10:00 PM
Test Questions
1. (10 marks) Using your lecture notes, describe the transmission of what
we call “Aesop’s fables.”
2.(10 marks) Using examples from your course readings, describe the
similarities and differences between a fable and a parable.
Greek Periods
Dark Age 1200-750BCE
Archaic - 750-510BCE: Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aesop
Classical - 510-323BCE: rise of Athens to death of Alexander
Hellenistic - 323-146 or 31BCE: (from death of Alexander to death
of Cleopatra)
Don’t need to memorize but its just an idea.
Transmission of Greek culture Hellenistic period: (334-31BCE)
Alexander the Great (356-323BCE): conquers regions east to
border of India: Library at Alexandria:
Roman Empire
Creatively imitate Greeks in their own literature; Greek rhetoric
essential for Roman education
Aspect of Greek culture (especially philosophy) taken up by Romans
(including Jews) and Christianized.
Literary Forms
Have studied historical prose; lyric poetry; epic poetry
Some forms die out; other develop (novel)
Wisdom literature: Proverbs, Fables, Parables
Proverb: short and clever, some obvious truth, gives guidance for
behavior
Parables (throwing alongside): popular invented short stories that
give truth about human nature by comparison
Fable: often use of animals who speak and act like human
May be interpreted as allegory but allegories usually more complex,
hidden, and have direct relations between symbol and what they
stand for.
Hesiod’s Practical Wisdom in Works and Days
Says his advice is not from experience but from Muses
Zeus here more like Yahweh than Homer’s Zeus: is just; sees all
Life is hard because “gods keep men’s food concealed”
Perses should work hard, listen to Right (Dike and not promote
violence
Hesiod’s practical advice
If you are violent, unjust, or lazy, you will suffer
Yet implies the unjust are still getting rewarded; Zeus hasn’t yet
brought to pass a just world, so best to do what’s most useful?
Gives Perses practical advice of all kinds: time management;
drinking; planting; urinating, sex, table manners.
More proverbial advice
Giving is its own reward
Don’t put off for tomorrow what you can do today
In business dealings with relations: smile but bring a witness.
When you hear the voice of the crane ploughing.
Never curse someone for being poor
Aesop: who was he?
Likely a slave of Idmon on island of Samons. Around 550 BCE who
become famous in Athens
Statue erected in his honor before those of seven Sages
Name of tradition as well as person (like Homer)
Moral to story is added in medieval times
Authors add own fables in Aesop’s name because
No copyright laws; no mass publication
Profit
Legitimizes own work

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Description
Lecture 12 1/9/2012 4:10:00 PM Test Questions 1. (10 marks) Using your lecture notes, describe the transmission of what we call “Aesop’s fables.” 2.(10 marks) Using examples from your course readings, describe the similarities and differences between a fable and a parable. Greek Periods  Dark Age – 1200-750BCE  Archaic - 750-510BCE: Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aesop  Classical - 510-323BCE: rise of Athens to death of Alexander  Hellenistic - 323-146 or 31BCE: (from death of Alexander to death of Cleopatra)  Don’t need to memorize but its just an idea. Transmission of Greek culture Hellenistic period: (334-31BCE)  Alexander the Great (356-323BCE): conquers regions east to border of India: Library at Alexandria: Roman Empire  Creatively imitate Greeks in their own literature; Greek rhetoric essential for Roman education  Aspect of Greek culture (especially philosophy) taken up by Romans (including Jews) and Christianized. Literary Forms  Have studied historical prose; lyric poetry; epic poetry  Some forms die out; other develop (novel) Wisdom literature: Proverbs, Fables, Parables  Proverb: short and clever, some obvious truth, gives guidance for behavior  Parables (throwing alongside): popular invented short stories that give truth about human nature by comparison  Fable: often use of animals who speak and act like human  May be interpreted as allegory but allegories usually more complex, hidden, and have direct relations between symbol and what they stand for. Hesiod’s Practical Wisdom in Works and Days  Says his advice is not from experience but from Muses  Zeus here more like Yahweh than Homer’s Zeus: is just; sees all  Life is hard because “gods keep men’s food concealed”  Perses should work hard, listen to Right (Dike and not promote violence Hesiod’s practical advice  If you are violent, unjust, or lazy, you will su
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