Class Notes (837,609)
Canada (510,370)
York University (35,409)
Humanities (1,683)
HUMA 1780 (152)
Lecture 12

Lecture 12

7 Pages
118 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Humanities
Course
HUMA 1780
Professor
Elicia Clements
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 12  Clements 1 School of Arts and Letters, Atkinson Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies  Summer 2009  AK/HUMA 1780 6.0A Stories in Diverse Media    ANNOUNCEMENTS  ♦ I have posted the assignment sheet for the Research Essay in the Assignments  folder.  ♦ To reiterate: the final exam date has been decided by the Registrar’s Office. It will  be on Friday Aug. 21 from 7pm to 10pm in the Ross Building south 137 (not on  Thursday Aug. 20 as I had initially hoped). Please make plans now to attend. This is  the final required component of the course. If you are off site you will need to  arrange for invigilation through Distance Education. Please see the following page to  get started: http://www.atkinson.yorku.ca/disted/offsiteExam/index.htm  ♦ Please be patient with the return of your essays and tests. I will have everything  back to you before July 31 . Please remember to check your yorku email account for  the return of your work at that time.    Other Sights and Sounds: Adaptations of The Turn of the Screw  Last week I talked about the two stories that run simultaneously in James's  gothic tale, The Turn of the Screw. The first narrative thread is the ghost story—the  reader believes that the apparitions are real and tormenting the children, implying that  everything the governess says is true. In the second version of events, the reader does  not believe the governess. Instead, she is another mad woman and she smothers the  children with her obsessive love. Yet, I also suggested last day that it is very difficult to  Lecture 12  Clements 2 tell on which side James's text lies because the ending is very ambiguous. It is difficult to  pin down exactly who is to blame for Miles's death because both possibilities (malicious  ghosts or unstable governess) run side by side in the text. The minute the reader thinks  "Aha, the governess is mad," the next sentence or word seems to contradict such an  interpretation. James's exacting skill is his ability to keep both stories alive  simultaneously, to keep the reader thinking and guessing about which version of the  events is true. Ultimately, James withholds any conclusive answers and so the focus of  the text shifts to the process of interpretation. How one reads this novella becomes the  important issue. And so I asked you to think about how you interpret the events in the  questions for discussion last day.  The result of this ambiguity in James's text is that an adaptor inevitably has great  difficulty keeping these different interpretations all working at once! This is primarily  because the adaptor no longer has access to that first‐person perspective unique to the  writer of fiction that I discussed in more detail in the last lecture. Nevertheless, the story  has been adapted into other media. To demonstrate how these issues about story  telling can change in a different medium I would like you to watch the finale of the  opera The Turn of the Screw (the last 10 minutes) composed by Benjamin Britten and  adapted into a libretto by Myfanwy Piper.  James wrote a novella that resists its own adaptation into other media. Thus,  these two adaptors (Britten and Piper) had their work cut out for them as soon as they  decided to turn this story into an opera. Remember in the very first lecture I mentioned  that adaptation is about losses and gains? Well here, Britten and Piper need to decide  Lecture 12  Clements 3 what they are going to do without access to the governess's mind, which is created by  the first‐person account set up by James. When one moves to a staged version of a  novel, then, the shift in story‐tellers (from a narrator to actors on a stage or film set) has  a substantial influence on how the narrative is communicated. So let's investigate: how  can Britten and Piper make up for the loss of a narrator? And given this loss, can they  still maintain the two stories at the same time? See Lecture Summary Slide 2.  First, a little bit of background on the composer. Benjamin Britten was an English  composer whose operas are responsible for bringing the British tradition of the genre  back to prominence. Until Britten, operas in English were relatively few and far between  and rarely successful. But Britten made a substantial contribution not only to British  opera, but also to the art form in general in the twentieth century with works such as  Billy Budd (based on Herman Melville's novella) and Death in Venice (based on Thomas  Mann's novella). The librettist for The Turn of the Screw, as I've mentioned, was  Myfanwy Piper, someone with whom Britten collaborated on two other operas, one of  them being Death in Venice. She suggested James's tale to Britten and then gave him a  libretto she had adapted from James's novella in 1954.  The opera that they created, because of the limited amount of characters in the  novella, uses a small group of singers and musicians. This is called a chamber opera.  Britten set the opera with a 13‐piece orchestra (this is very small, especially in  comparison to Strauss; you will be able to hear the difference). They also decided to  keep the same sort of pace as the novella, which is divided into 24 short chapters. The  opera is comprised of 16 short scenes with musical interludes in between them. There  Lecture 12  Clements 4 are two segments that have no source in James's text. Importantly, these segments are  scenes that focus on the ghosts, which effectively gives them bigger parts in the opera  than in the novella. As I have mentioned, the ghosts in James's version never speak, but  in the opera, of course, they sing. Please read the questions on Lecture Summary Slide  3 and watch the ten minute clip I have provided in the link to Youtube now, before  readin
More Less

Related notes for HUMA 1780

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit