MUSI 1530 Lecture Notes - Background Music, Doo-Wop, Jump Blues

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29 Mar 2013
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CHAPTER SEVEN:
Bel canto – “beautiful singing”; Classical vocal technique that produces clarity of the
voice, and promotes a resonant, open timbre, and the elongation of single vowel sounds;
Frank Sinatra claimed to have used this as the basis of his singing (p.159)
Blues crooner – a type of intimate and gentle blues singer, spurred by the development
of singing technique that relied upon the use of a microphone; contrasts with the rough-
edged rural style (p.173); also Cocktail blues (p.174); Chicago electric blues (p. 175)
Coda – “tail” – concluding (often very short) section of a piece. (p.161)
Countrypolitan –country music geared to an urban audience (p. 185)
Cover –a recreation of a previously existing song. This is often done when an
artist/recording company releases its own version of with the intention of cashing in on
its commercial potential, but may also be argued to act as a form of homage. (p. 170)
Doo-wop – vocal harmony groups of post WW II period Rhythm and Blues (p.177)
Jump blues; jump bands –a scaled down version of the swing band; the first
commercially successful category of Rhythm and Blues just after WW II – (p. 170)
Melisma – many notes sung to a single syllable. Ie) “Gloooooooooo-ri-a” in “Angels We
Have Heard on High” (p.183)
Movieola – a juke-box-like machine that played short musical films; the forerunner of
modern videos. (p.168)
Muzak – a corporation that produced music to subliminally affect the listener’s state of
mind; found in doctor’s offices, shopping malls, elevators and the like. (p. 153)
Overdubbing – to re-record on top of existing sound on tape; to add layers of sound
through multiple recordings (p.155)
Payola – money given to DJs by record companies to entice DJs to give more air time to
the promotion of their songs. (p.154)
Rockabilly – a genre in which rock ‘n’ roll was blended with hillbilly/country style;
Elvis Presley’s early music is an example (p.187)
Rpm – revolutions per minute of vinyl recordings: ie) 78; 33 1/3; 45 (p.155)
Rubato – “robbed time” – the speeding up and slowing down of the beat to give added
expressiveness to the phrasing. (p.161)
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Document Summary

Bel canto beautiful singing ; classical vocal technique that produces clarity of the voice, and promotes a resonant, open timbre, and the elongation of single vowel sounds; Frank sinatra claimed to have used this as the basis of his singing (p. 159) Coda tail concluding (often very short) section of a piece. (p. 161) Countrypolitan country music geared to an urban audience (p. 185) Cover a recreation of a previously existing song. This is often done when an artist/recording company releases its own version of with the intention of cashing in on its commercial potential, but may also be argued to act as a form of homage. (p. 170) Doo-wop vocal harmony groups of post ww ii period rhythm and blues (p. 177) Jump blues; jump bands a scaled down version of the swing band; the first commercially successful category of rhythm and blues just after ww ii (p. 170) Melisma many notes sung to a single syllable.

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