NATS 1775 Lecture Notes - Melvin Kranzberg, Mcclelland & Stewart, Ben Goldacre

73 views11 pages
Published on 19 Apr 2013
School
York University
Department
Natural Science
Course
NATS 1775
Professor
York University
SC/NATS 1775B 6.0 Technology and Civilization
Instructor: Dr. Vera Pavri
E-mail: pavri@yorku.ca
Lectures: Tues and Thurs 4-5:30pm, ACE 102
Office Hrs: Thursdays from 5:30pm to 6:30pm, Bethune 217 – Please contact first
______________________________________________________________
Course Description:
This course examines the history, development and use of key technologies from antiquity to
present day. We will explore how social, political and economic factors can have an effect on the
success or failure of new technologies, and the impact new technologies have on society. Key
themes that will be surveyed in this course include a) technology, culture, race and gender, b)
religion and technology, c) the relationship between science and technology, d) the management
of technology, and e) how users shape new technologies. Further information about natural
science courses can be found at www.nats.yorku.ca.
Class Format:
The class is scheduled to meet on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 4-5:30pm. Classes will
begin with a lecture followed by a discussion period of class readings. Students are required to
remain for both the lecture and discussion periods. Attendance is mandatory.
Required Texts:
1. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet: Technology and Culture from the Renaissance
to the Present. 2nd Ed. Baltimore: John Hopkins U. Press, 2011.
2. Technology and Civilization Course Reader
3. Ben Goldacre, Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks and Big Pharma Flacks. McClelland &
Stewart, 2011.
Evaluation:
Book Assignment (7%) Due Thursday Nov. 22 2012
Midterm Exam (25%) Held During Fall Exam Period
Technological Controversy Paper (25%) Due Thursday March 21 2013
Final Exam (35%) Held During Spring Exam Period
Attendance/Participation (8%) Details in class
Further information about your book assignment and technological controversy paper can be
found in your course package and on the Moodle website.
Students with physical, learning or psychiatric disabilities who require reasonable
accommodations in teaching style or evaluation methods should discuss this with the Course
Director early in the term so that appropriate arrangements can be made.
The penalty for late papers is 5% per day and I will not accept papers that are more than three
days late. Also, other than documented medical emergencies, students who hand in late papers
1
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 11 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
due to illness will still receive a late penalty. Please note that being ill for a few days before a
paper is due does not constitute a medical emergency.
Course Website:
The course website is: http://moodle.yorku.ca
Once you go this website, you must enter in your Passport York User ID and Password in order
to access courses. The course is listed under the Faculty of Science and Engineering.
Please note that I will provide very detailed lecture notes that will be posted on the course
website. Although these notes are extensive, it is still imperative that you come to class. This is
because our in-class lectures will highlight what material is most important to know. This will
allow you to focus your attention on what you really need to know to do well on exams. Also,
don’t forget that participation is worth 8% of your mark.
NATS-AID:
NATS-AID is a student-run academic support service designed to help York University
undergraduate students excel in their Natural Science courses. Their team of dedicated tutors will
clarify course material and offer general guidance on assignments, enabling you to complete
them independently with a higher degree of success. Tutors are available for most NATS
courses. To check tutor availability for your course and contact a tutor, point your web browser
to http://natsaid.blog.yorku.ca/tutors/.
NATS-AID, with the help of instructors, also recruits class representatives for each Natural
Science course. Class representatives will assist you in forming study groups to prepare for
upcoming quizzes and tests. They will also pass along concerns, compliments, or suggestions
about your course or its content to your professor and/or the Division of Natural Science. For
more information on class representatives, including how to contact your rep, please visit:
http://natsaid.blog.yorku.ca/class-reps/.
General Information:
The last date students can enroll in this course without the permission of the instructor is: Sept.
19, 2012
The last date students can enroll in this course with the permission of the instructor is: October
23, 2012
The last date students can drop the course without receiving a grade is: Feb. 15, 2013
Important information for students regarding the Ethics Review process, Access/Disability,
Academic Honesty/Integrity, Student Conduct, and Religious Observance Days is available on
the CCAS webpage (see Reports, Initiatives, Documents):
http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/senate_cte_main_pages/ccas
Students who feel that there are extenuating circumstances which may interfere with the
successful completion of the exam or other course requirements are encouraged to discuss the
matter with the Course Director as soon as possible.
2
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 11 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
2012-13 SC/NATS 1775B 6.0: Technology and Civilization
Lecture Schedule and Readings
Date Topic Readings
Thursday Sept. 6 Introduction to Course
Tuesday Sept. 11
&
Thursday Sept. 13
Questions Concerning Technology 1. (T&C Reader) Sergio Sismondo, “Two
Questions Concerning Technology”, pp. 1-9
2. (T&C Reader) Melvin Kranzberg, “Technology
and History: ‘Kranzberg’s Laws,’” pp. 11-18
3. (Moodle) Paul Leonardi and Michele Jackson,
“Technological Determinism and Discursive
Closure in Organizational Mergers,” Journal of
Organizational Change Management, pp. 615-28.
Tuesday Sept. 18
&
Thursday Sept. 20
Technology in Ancient Civilizations 1. (T&C Reader) James E. Edwards, “Building
the Great Pyramid: Probable Construction
Methods at Giza,” pp. 19-26
2. (T&C Reader) Nataraja Sarma, “Diffusion of
Astronomy in the Ancient World,” pp. 27-36
Tuesday Sept. 25
&
Thursday Sept. 27
Technology in the Middle Ages
1. (T&C Reader) Pamela Long, “Technology in
the Medieval West,” pp. 39-48
2. (T&C Reader) Justin Y. Lin, “The Needham
Puzzle: Why the Industrial Revolution did not
Originate in China,” pp. 49-60.
Tuesday October 2
&
Thursday October 4
Technology in the Renaissance and
Early Modern Period, Part I
1. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet, Chap.
1: Technologies of the Court, pp. 1-32.
2. (T&C Reader) Sungook Hong,
“Historiographical Layers in the Relationship
between Science and Technology,” pp. 61-68
Tuesday October 9
&
Thursday October 11
Technology in the Renaissance and
Early Modern Period, Part II
1. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet, Chap.
2: Techniques of Commerce, pp. 33-58.
2. Carolyn Merchant, “The Scientific Revolution
and the Death of Nature,” pp. 69-84
Tuesday October 16
&
Thursday October 18
The Industrial Revolution 2. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet,
Chapter 3: Geographies of Industry, pp. 57-96.
Tuesday October 23
&
Thursday October 25
Technology and Imperialism 1. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet,
Chapter 4: Instruments of Empire, pp. 98-127.
2. (T&C Reader) Michael Adas, “Contested
Hegemony: The Great War and the Afro-Asian
Assault on the Civilizing Mission,” pp. 87-103
Tuesday November 6 Science, Technology and the Birth of 1. Thomas Misa, Leonardo to the Internet,
3
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 11 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in

Document Summary

Thursdays from 5:30pm to 6:30pm, bethune 217 please contact first. This course examines the history, development and use of key technologies from antiquity to present day. We will explore how social, political and economic factors can have an effect on the success or failure of new technologies, and the impact new technologies have on society. Key themes that will be surveyed in this course include a) technology, culture, race and gender, b) religion and technology, c) the relationship between science and technology, d) the management of technology, and e) how users shape new technologies. Further information about natural science courses can be found at www. nats. yorku. ca. The class is scheduled to meet on tuesday and thursday afternoons from 4-5:30pm. Classes will begin with a lecture followed by a discussion period of class readings. Students are required to remain for both the lecture and discussion periods.

Get OneClass Grade+

Unlimited access to all notes and study guides.

YearlyMost Popular
75% OFF
$9.98/m
Monthly
$39.98/m
Single doc
$39.98

or

You will be charged $119.76 upfront and auto renewed at the end of each cycle. You may cancel anytime under Payment Settings. For more information, see our Terms and Privacy.
Payments are encrypted using 256-bit SSL. Powered by Stripe.