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POLS 3170 (18)
Lecture

POLS3170lect2-tuesdaysept24.docx
POLS3170lect2-tuesdaysept24.docx

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School
York University
Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 3170
Professor
Glenn Goshulak
Semester
Fall

Description
Tuesday September 24 , 2013 Canada’s Social Policy – Lecture 2 Social Policy During the Keynesian Era The Institutional Approach (1945-73) The ideas about poverty, healthcare , about what things citizens should get  Social welfare as a major integrated institution in society  Universal services to be provided outside the market o If you are out of work there will be gov supplied services.  Eligibility based on need, not deserving/undeserving Post – World War one  Rising pressures for changes  Government Responses o Red scare-policies; they said that these are communist movements here to over throw capital system o Anti-Loafing Law – if you are not gainfully employed you could be subject to arrestment, imprisonment or deportation if necessary  Capital’s Response o By the owners of means of production or factory owners was repression. lets fire the malcontents o They did try to make some concession to workers they tried to introduce- Corporate welfare.  Mixed effects on social policy o Government support capital o Only real reform: veterans o Social gospelers – calling for planned economy  Department of soldiers “civil re-establishment (DSCR)  Offering some form of military pensions , employment programs  Soldiers settlement scheme  Loans to purchase land and farms  Major Sate programs o Mothers Allowances  Money given to solider wives that were hurt in war.  If you were divorced , had property, Japanese you were not included.  Recipients (select few)were closely monitored- they had to have an acceptable household. o Old Age Pensions  Based on how much you make  Less money you make, more you qualify o Mackenzie- committed to full employment insurance , full pensions , etc. didn’t do them  Did none of the above but reduced taxes and tarrifs  This was important because of the Great Depression  1926- 26% labor force was unemployed, because of high level unemployed they need to maintain peace,  o Unemployment insurance World War II an After : growing demands  Wartime economy o Gov’t must always get involved and describe how war will be fought o Used payroll deduction to fund war o Everyone was working during the war o Seen as an alternative to capitalism- workers became more militant and demanded more  Growing consensus that social system would work better than capitalism o More and more people are being attracted to socialism o 2/5 people wanted public ownership of the major industries. Wanted the government to own it o 1943- 29% population would like represented by semi-socialist government CCF. o 28% for liberal and conservatives. o Solutions would be to steal their policies  Keynesian: an alternative for saving capitalism  Comes as a response to the depression.  Keynes – liberal economist  His focus: production creates his own demand o Problem of Depression o Calls for limited planning and intervention into markets o Demand management  King (1941) o Establishes unofficial advisory body on post-war reforms o To make recommendations on housing, social policy , status of women  Marsh Report ( parallel to Beveridge Report in Uk)  Comprehensive social security  Reinforce gender-role division o It assumed t rigid gender division. The Nuclear Family model o Family allowance  It would be good because it would keep women in the house hold  Kept children inschool  Reforms get stalled (1945) o Threat from CCF recedes o Fear that tax raises for corpo Taxation and social speding: background  BNA: Federal – provincial jurisdiction o Part of Federalism  Social services part of provincial jurisdiction  Taxation part of federal jurisdiction (sort of)  Rowell- Sirois Commission (1940)  To look at the finances arrangements in confederation the problem of who has
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