Class Notes (836,983)
Canada (509,984)
York University (35,352)
POLS 4080 (6)
Lecture

Lecture Notes - January 21, 2014
Premium

5 Pages
48 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 4080
Professor
Stephen Newman
Semester
Winter

Description
January 21, 2014   • Point in Waldron's reading is that Locke fails, has not shown that persecution is  capable of achieving the desired end, which is change in belief  • If you believe you're brother, sister, is on road to perdition, should reason with  them, try to persuade them about the error of their ways but that is as much as you  can do, true of private individuals and of the ruler o When it comes to religion, everybody is perfectly free to try to spread the  word o No one should use force to attempt to change the beliefs o It is precisely violence or the threat of violence that defines persecution o To attempt to coerce individual o As if using violence could affect a change in belief ­ which Locke doesn't  think can be done o Waldron says that Locke is making the argument that persecution is  irrational ­ wrong tool for the job • Waldron's argument doesn't really change, epistemological argument doesn't  change o No belief can be coerced according to Locke o Waldron says, granting that one can still argue that coercion can be effective  at changing belief if used in this way (requiring people to attend church, recite  creed, reading books, controlling what books are available) o You indirectly have an influence on the beliefs that they form o If that's true, Locke's argument fails ­ it becomes logical to persecute in  these ways • If way to make god happy is to go recite particular prayer a certain way….  Coercion in this context seems to be rational ­ make people say the words in  Hebrew, then eventually they learn the meaning over time (presupposition) o Use of force can be rational ­ Waldron • Force good at controlling behavior, but Locke has a different argument about why  we shouldn't have absolute political rulers o In letter, he's concerned with why states ought not persecute each other and  citizens persecuting one another, central to that argument is that people  persecute to change people's beliefs o For locke, state exists to protect man's civil interests­ that's why we have  states o Problem is people persecute with a  good conscience to change people's  beliefs to save their souls and yo want to stop them from doing this • Knowing difference between wall being purple or white is immediate ­ sensory  input, you look at it and you know o Religious choices not the same, can't make that decision just by looking at  catholic church, etc.  o Must learn about the religion o Locke thinks it's too important to entrust your soul to someone else, it's  responsibility of own person to figure it out, that's why he's such a big  supporting of toleration o Can't leave to state, parents, etc. ­ every person has a fundamental interest in  state of their soul, should think carefully about what church/religion to belong  to  o Waldron addresses whether or not force can in any way influence this  reflection, if it can shape beliefs o Waldron's conclusion is that it can, locke says it can't so we shouldn't use  force, Waldron says we can by forcing people to read books and listen to  information from sermon, because people form beliefs based on what they read  and information they receive ­ locke's argument fails, doesn't provide barrier  • Other problems with locke's argument • Waldron wants something that would be universal, otherwise you can say we  depend for the moral sanction on the teachings of each religion, meaning you'd need  a separate argument from each religion • Waldron wants is universal prohibition to leave everybody alone, that it's morally  wrong to persecute anyone, not because persecution is ineffective, but because it's  morally wrong to do this to other people o Locke resting heavily on gospel argument, he's got a specific argument in  mind, he's talking to the England of his time, Christian nation, mostly  protestant, some catholic, fewer Jews and members of Islam o He's appealing to ta gospel that they all share o Outliers in this story of Jews and Muslims whoa re extended benefit of  gospel prohibition, no need to appeal  to Jews and Muslims on their own terms  because they were in such small number • Waldron not looking at context of Locke's time and his audience, etc., he's just  trying to see if there's something he can use in that argument today in order to say  that coercion can affect belief ­ is there a contradiction? o Locke's argument doesn’t look as good to us now, religious changes in  Canada, etc. • The way in which locke's argument places limits on what the magistrate can do ­ in  acting the magistrate may only act for legitimate public purposes, state exists to  protect civil interests ­ gov't, ruler, may only act in ways to protect those interest o Sometimes commands of magistrate may look like things that some  religions do like (washing infants ­ locke's example ­ public health measure,  this is allowable ­ but can state command baptism? No, it's a religious purpose,  not civil interest) o Another example: pagan sacrifice of cattle, legal to slaughter them, legal to  sacrifice ­ but now there's a disease, cattle shortage, nation's livestock needs to  be protected, state puts ban on cattle slaughtering • Locke says this is a legitimate public purpose ­ effect of law is to  prevent pagan from sacrificing his calf • Waldron is cheeky about it, says without the sacrifice of the calf,  maybe pagan's will be turned away from religion • Locke says no harm done because magistrate did not intend to harm  pagan, to suppress religion, it was unintended consequence of legitimate  public measure ­ cold comfort for the pagan • We wouldn't do that in Canada today? We'd probably say is there a  way to accommodate the pagan? .. Most religions don’t' require sacrifice  of calves, people can do without meat, but this religious community won't  survive ­ maybe we can set a few aside. Locke says no need for that • There are limits to Locke's argument  Today's second reading: Wal
More Less

Related notes for POLS 4080

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit