Class Notes (834,628)
Canada (508,661)
York University (35,156)
Psychology (4,108)
PSYC 1010 (1,345)
Lecture

Chapter 12 Personality: Theory, Research, and Assessment

4 Pages
567 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 1010
Professor
Gerry Goldberg
Semester
Winter

Description
Personality ­Personality refers to an individual’s unique constellation of behavioral traits. ­A personality trait is considered to be a durable disposition to behave a certain way in  various situations.  ­Raymond B Cattell is a psychologist who would give huge questionnaires of simple  questions that would identify personality traits of an individual. Then he would find  correlations through a Factor Analysis, finding a hidden reason why they would correlate. ­Eysenck’s theory is based on biology playing a big role in determining life. He created a  model of personality structure, based off a hierarchy of traits.  ­He argued that introverts would be more conditioned, aware of their environment. This  meant that if you were insensitive to the environment you would end up stimulating  yourself by being lively, active, sociable etc. You became an extravert.  ­Habitual responses are the responses you give to the environment by hanging out,  partying etc, as an extravert. Specific responses are questions about what an individual  likes in order to determine ­> a habitual response ­> which then confirms a trait and ­>  categorizes the individual as an extravert/introvert. ­The five­factor model used to describe human personality consists of: agreeableness (willingness to collaborate) neuroticism (negative emotionality) conscientiousness (tendency to be reliable and ethical)  extraversion (positive emotionality, ability to bond with others) openness to experience (being a problem­solver) ­There is no definite insight into development of personalities. For that, we study:  psychodynamic , behavioural, humanistic, and biological perspectives. ­Psychodynamic perspective was born in the Victorian era. It was offending because it  suggested that we are not masters of our own mind. However, it attempts to explain  personality, motivation and psychological disorders by focusing on childhood  experiences, unconscious thoughts and methods people use to cope with  aggressive/sexual urges. ­Personality is made up of: Id – part of the mind where innate instinctive impulses lie and seek satisfaction. (sexual  urges, hunger etc) Ego ­ the part of the mind responsible for reality testing and a sense of personal identity. Superego – is the part of nervous system that stores information. It understands the rules  of society. (ex. stealing) ­There are three levels of unconscious: awareness conscious, preconscious and  unconscious. ­Anxiety and defensive mechanisms are part of our everyday talk and culture.  Anxiety is  an internal tension in the unconscious. This happens due to Id or superego getting out of  control.  ­Because anxiety is unpleasant, we use a defensive mechanism, which is made up of  unconscious reactions to protect ourselves from feelings of guilt/anxiety. Defensive  mechanisms consist of rationalization (creating false excuses to justify), repression  (keeping dark thoughts buried in unconsciousness), and reaction formation (behaving in  a way opposite to one’s true feelings). ­Freud’s Psychosexual Development Stages are: Oral ­ the infant's primary source of interaction occurs through the mouth, so the infant  derives pleasure from oral stimulation through gratifying activities such as tasting and  sucking. Because the infant is entirely dependent upon caretakers, it develops a sense of  trust and comfort through this oral stimulation. Anal ­ The major conflict at this stage is toilet training. The child has to learn to control  his or her bodily needs. Developing this control leads to a sense of accomplishment and  independence. Phallic ­ At this age, children begin to discover the differences between males and  females. Freud also believed that boys begin to view their father as a rival for their  mother’s affections. Latency ­ The development of the ego and superego contribute to this period of calm.  The stage begins around the time that children enter school and become more concerned  with peer relationships, hobbies and other interests. It is a time of exploration in which  the sexual energy is still present, but it is 
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit