Class Notes (834,868)
Canada (508,774)
York University (35,167)
Social Science (3,019)
SOSC 1375 (193)
Lecture

SOSC 1375 LECTURE NOTES .docx

23 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 1375
Professor
Olena Kobzar
Semester
Winter

Description
Law in Everyday Life  01/21/2014 SOSC1375 Hard Content: Jan. 14 , 2014 th Is Law and Justice the Same Thing? They coincide but at times they do not  eg – crime of necessity ­> lady stealing baby formula to provide for kids  we all would feel wrong to send her to jail even though it is actually a crime she committed Moral  Ambiguities and the Law  Dobson vs. Dobson case  Ms. Dobson, pregnant, gives birth to Ryan Dobson who has cerebral palsy due to a big accident (caused his disorder)  Son and grandfather sued mom for support and health care  You are considered human when you take your first breath, this was created due to abortion laws  Sue Rodriguez  ALS – slowly drowning  Wanted does to aid in suicide (euthanasia)  Structure of Courts  Outline of Canada’s court system  Supreme court of Canada  …  Provincial court of Ontario  *        CANADIAN LAW         .­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­'­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­.         |                                          |  Substantive Law                           Procedural Law (Statute Law and                               (Rules)  Case Law)        |      .­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­.      |                                         |  Public Law                           Private or Civil Law      |                                         |    .­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­.              |    |            |               |              | Criminal  Constitutional  Administrative       |   Law          Law             Law             |                                                |               .­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­.               |         |         |        |          |             Family   Contract    Tort   Property    Labour               Law      Law       Law      Law        Law Definitions: *Substantive Law ­ consists of all laws that set out the rights and obligations of persons. Procedural Law ­ outlines the steps and procedures involved in protecting and enforcing the rights given under Substantive  Law, i.e. the rules of court, etc.  Public Law – regulates the relationships between the state and individuals, or between states. Civil Law ­ regulates the personal relationships between two private parties.  Criminal Law – state defined prohibitions with penalties  Constitutional Law ­ Laws establishing the make­up of government and the division of powers between federal and  provincial governments.  Administrative Law ­ governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Family Law ­ deals with the relationships between individuals living together.  Contract Law – covers disputes over legally binding agreements.  Tort Law ­ deals with private wrongs committed against one another, e.g. injury caused by negligence. Property Law ­ deals with issues between individuals over land/renting  Labour Law ­ deals with all relationships between employers and employees. Law as a Technical Game:  Complex rules: players, functioning, procedures, questions, outcomes  Lawyers: specialists trained in identifying and applying rules  Lawyers: transforms litigants’ complaints into legal disputes  Judges:  Canadian judicial council (CJC)  Sentencing: Consistency – Parliament passed bill C – 41 to codify, sentencing principles  Proportionally: gravity of offence & degree of responsibility  Trials & Stories  The Law of Everyday Life: So far we have been looking at formal legal structures. But how is law experienced in day to day life? How do people know what’s legal and illegal, not having studied the law? Practice of Law – Law as Naratology: Can change our perception on a person’s view eg. Woman=mom= good person Just as everyday experience of law is different from formal textbook law, so too is the practice of law more than textbook law In practice of law, what goes on in the courtroom is the telling of stories and it matters what kind of stories you tell Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 Looking Back at Law: Lecture Outline Normal/Abnormal: On what basis to we decide that something is normal/abnormal?  Societies standards  What is common, is considered normal Religion  “That’s only natural”  Today we will explore how social belies figure in the contraction of normal/abnormal distinction, how do we decide between the  two Social Beliefs : Narratology and Social Norms: *Narratology – who is telling the story  The telling of stories invokes a  certain social norms  If we say someone is a mom then she will be considered good  Some Terms: Rule of Law – all ppl are equal under the law  Eg. president and me are equal  Moral Panic ­ a disruption that threatens the social order of a society Eg. Moral panic about salt, but ppl need salt. Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 Blown out of proportion to justify something  Law as Regulator of Morals – changes our views and how society works and our morality Law as Containment – law tries to govern and contain ppl from certain things  Eg. Drugs are prohibited  Clara Ford (1894):  Early 30ies, Black and White (Mulatto), seamstress, unmarried  She allegedly shot and killed Frank Westwood (18, well to do family)  FB Johnston – Lawyer BB Oster – prosecutor  She crossed dressed to be more comfortable but ppl used this against her to say she is unpredictable and crazy  She shot him bc he tried to rape her  Looked bad on family bc young man was associated with her in a unorthodox relationship shaming the name  She confessed to murdering him and played into the norm of saying how men are convincing and use sexist stereotypes to help  her win the case  Carrie Davies(1915):  18, England, servant  young, white, innocent, hardworking, ugly clothing  Bert Massey had rep for womanizing and presented as a bad guy  Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 She shot him to prevent raping  She argued by manipulating social norms and saying it was defense  Paternalizing  Medicalization – medical profession in the legal sector  COMMONALITY B/W BOTH CASES: They play into the paternalization of courts, the courts protecting these woman  Was she responsible for her actions? Blamed insanity  Recent Cases: Shafia Trial  Mom used the fact about mom’s not killing kid to help her.  Colonel David Russel William  Really successful police officer but was a rapist and serial killer and stole female underwear and took pictures  Pictures were shown in court to make him seem abnormal Psychopathology: Bedlam Asylum – mental institution,  for mentally sick ppl and become beggars on the street.  People would go see these  ppl and take a stick and hit the grate to agitate  It was entertainment and to reassure themselves in the distinction b/w normal and abnormal  Medicalization: entrance of medical  Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 The Modern Era: much of what we see as the abnormal now becomes medicalized  Its no longer an aberration departing from the right path  Medicalization of Social Problems: it’s a medical problem requiring a medical solution  Massages in Swedish prisons allowed for ppl to feel something positive through touch, unlike what they are used to.  Medicalization of social problems  Criminal Law: Canadian Criminal Code 1892  Federal gov of Canada passed the first criminal code  Statutory Law – body of law passed by legislatures Prime ministers are very powerful Common Law – judge made law Sec. 16 of the Criminal Code:  1. Defense of mental disorder – No person is criminally responsible for an act committed or an omission made while suffering  from a mental disorder that rendered the person incapable of appreciating the nature and quality of the act or omission or of  knowing that it was wrong.  Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 2. Presumption – Every person is presumed not to suffer from a mental disorder so as to be exempt from criminal responsibility  by virtue of subsection (1), until the contrary is proved on the balance of probabilities.  3. Burden of Proof – The burden of proof that an accused was suffering from a mental disorder so as to be exempt from criminal  responsibility is on the party that raises the issue.  R. v. Daviault (1994): Henry Daviault , Alcoholic = disease  Asked to get some alcohol for friend  He sexually assaulted his semi paralyzed friend  Automatism – do something like machines but youre not there mentally  Can this defense of automatism be used?  State brought on by intoxication, therefore couldn’t form “general intent” R. v. Stone (1999): Bert married to Donna  Difficult relationship  Trip to Vancouver. Conflict He drove to an abandoned parking lot She yells and insults his sexual prowess  He claims that a whooshing sensation came over him and next all he sees is Donna’s body, stabbed 47 times  At trial defense, he pleaded insane automatism, non­insane automatism , lack of intent and in alternative, provocation. The judge  allowed for a defense of insane automatism  Jury convicted him of manslaughter and sentenced him to 7 years  Verdict appealed, upheld by Court Appeal, Supreme Court  Looking Back at Law  01/21/2014 What is the Difference? Medicalized ways of dealing with criminal culpability  Shift from moral vocabulary (normal/abnormal distinction) to medicalized vocabulary (normal/abnormal) distinction  Something in society changed to incorporate medicalization  Same process of distinguishing normal from abnormal but different discourses  Article Assignment: Mar 11 in lec  Approve no later than feb 11  Midterm exam Must know narratology (hooks back to doxa) and medicalization application in midterm  Carrie Davies/Clara Ford cases  Section 16  Daviault and Stone   Indigenous Perspectives and Legal Pluralism 2014­01­21 649  Why are some prisons filled with 80% of aboriginals? Law and Society: All societies have laws We criminalize based on certain fears  Eg. Iran, stone to death with adultery  Eg. Marijuana, might cause people to be unproductive and might be destructive to the social system  Laws grow from customs, social behavior and norms  Law draws a boundary of acceptable and not acceptable  Legal Pluralism: two or more legal systems coexisting together in one geographic area  The first question that needs to be asked is what is law? Normative order within a social group, law establishes certain norms.  Institution of the state – help normalize  The Courts: 1996: Canadian Criminal Code amended (sec. 718.2e): specifically instructs judges to look for alternatives in imprisonment for  aboriginal people  R. v. Gladue (1999) She thought boyfriend cheated and stabbed and charged and prosecuted, judge saw she was aboriginal and was told to serve  less time bc of this.  Does this mean that aboriginals should get lighter sentences that non aboriginal offenders? What about other immigrants?  Indigenous Perspectives and Legal Pluralism 2014­01­21 Aboriginal Law: Importance of Elders – more experience, know that everything passes, wiser, better, known as pillar of community  Healing: body, mind, spirit – you couldn’t just punish the body, you had to deal with all parts of the body  Harmony as an overriding principle in disputes/no conflict society  Conflict can be
More Less

Related notes for SOSC 1375

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit