Class Notes (837,178)
Canada (510,153)
York University (35,409)
Social Science (3,019)
SOSC 2350 (212)
Lecture

law and society making space for mosques

4 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 2350
Professor
Tanja Juric
Semester
Fall

Description
Week 8 Lecture – February 24, 2014 Making Space for Mosques  How the constitution of spaces:  ­ are organized to sustain unequal social relations ­ Eg the homeless & the padlocking of parks ­ reproduce racial hierarchies ­ space Produces a particular kind of social imaginary, you hear media reports stating good/bad places to live. ­ le “dangerous” spaces; “good” neighbourhoods ­ Up on the hill, “the bad side of the tracks” Space has always been used in a way to reproduce social hierarchies.  All of this information has less to do with the space but the actual people that are inhabiting the space. Mapping ­ Is an organization and symbolic reproduction of space and spatial relations ­ lt structures and produces relations ­ It fundamentally is about boundaries & borders. ­ Was a tool of the colonial enterprise ­ A type of spatial domination/mastery ­ It is a way of knowing Unmapping ­ Not only to denaturalize geography by asking how spaces come to be but also to undermine the idea of white settler innocence & to uncover the ideologies & practices of conquest & domination. National myths: Who and what is “Canada”? ­ National myths as ideologies of citizenship. Myth of Canada as a white settler society: 1.Conquest of an uninhabited land whereby the term ”uninhabited” would consist of the production of aboriginal peoples as “not Christian, not civilized,  not commercial, not ‘evolved’” (Razack, Race, Space & the Law, 3) 2.The “empty land” developed by hardy & enterprising European settlers ­ people of colour are scripted as “late arrivals” after development has occurred. ­ A national amnesia or disavowal of slavery, indentureship and labour exploitation: ­ Eg Chinese who built the national railway & the Sikhs who worked in the 19  century lumber industry. 3.Modern Canada now “besieged” & crowded by “Third World” refugees & immigrants these groups are apparently threatening the calm and orderly space of the original inhabitants.  ­ These new arrivals threaten the calm, orderly spaces of the original (ie. colonial settler) inhabitants ­ Also threaten principles & foundations of liberal democracy ­ Ref anti­immigration policies, increased policing of borders, anxiety around terrorism. The problem with these moral panics is that they have objective reprucissions that cause increased policing, terrorism etc to monitor or deter immigrants. When police target aboriginal youth, or target certain races these are objective reprocussions. The role of space in this racialization is when certain areas promote white culture rather then other races. There are some areas of the city that are  completely full of white some others are full of coloured people.  You can see in the way that the space of a city is separated that is represents the segregation of space due to race. In this article space is never to be understood as innocent and it is always the result of unequal relations due to race. How much an identity of dominance rely on racializing others to keep them in place? How does place become race? Toronto’s Changing Demographics ­ In less than a generation: from an overwhelmingly white Christian society to a multiracial, multi­faith society. ­ In 1990s: 4 out of 10 immigrants to Canada settled in the GTA ­ By 2000: immigrants made up 48% of Toronto’s population. ­ Countries of origin of immigrants: shifted from European to mainly Asian, South Asian & Middle Eastern. A large shift in a short amount of time. Issues of “integration” & citizenship  Despite federal policy & official discourse of racial harmony & commitment to multiculturalism: ­ Many immigrant groups occupy a marginal & racialized position in Toronto’s social space.  Citizenship = not only a legal status, but also as participation & influence over the city’s (nation’s) economic, social, cultural & political spheres. This  demonstrates a citizen that is entitled and has influence in shaping the voice and future of the nation. ­ Racialized immigrant groups: high levels of poverty, severe levels of unemployment, overrepresentation in        low­skill jobs, & low home­ownership rates. Distinction between Informal vs formal spheres of citizenship Informal: all of Those practices of immigrants that claim public space as their own to foster the formation of new group identities. ­ Eg street parades, media presence, & park and civic square permits = active claim­staking to citizenship. ­ Space is crucial to identity especially for homeless who have no space to claim as their own or to fight for rights or issues to be solved. i.e  occupy Toronto.  ­ Informal sphere is very active and claims are being made about ide
More Less

Related notes for SOSC 2350

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit