Class Notes (837,186)
Canada (510,155)
York University (35,409)
Social Science (3,019)
SOSC 2350 (212)
Lecture 10

Marxism- Lecture 10.docx

2 Pages
181 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 2350
Professor
Tanja Juric
Semester
Fall

Description
Law and Society  SOSC 2350  Week 9­ Lecture 10 Marx, Marxism and The Law  Intro to Marx:  • One th the most highly influenced thinkers of the modern period   ▯19  Century: a time of industrialization, political and social upheaval and revolt, and colonialism).  • His work combined economics, philosophy, sociology, history  • Developed a powerful critique of capitalism.  Karl Marx:  • Lived from 1818­1883 • Contemporaneous with the 2  Industrial Revolution  • Philosopher, political economist, socialist and labour activist • Major works include:   ▯Communist Manifesto (w/Engels) 1847  ▯Das Kapital  Marx as a conflict theorist:  • Law is not the expression of society’s common values  ▯(i.e: Society not formed or structured upon consensus) • Instead societies are divided by class conflicts:   ▯“The History of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles”  • Modern bourgeoisie is the product of a long course of development – a series of revolutions   ▯But it has not done away with class antagonisms   ▯Established new classes, new conditions of oppression, new forms of struggle in place of old ones.  “The bourgeoisie, wherever it has got the upperhand, has put an end to all feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations. It  has pitilessly torn asunder the motley feudal ties that bound man to his ‘natural superiors’, and has left  remaining no other nexus between man and man than naked self­interest, than callous ‘cash payment’  Sociological and Political:  • Unlike Durkheim and Weber, Marx did not see his sociology isolated from political action  • But they were all “evolutionary social theorists”, legal systems evolved with socio­eco system (Calavita  at 12)  ­ the law itself is looking forward and is making judgments today and try to control on how things will  unfold in the future.  • Thus, Marxism is both a sociologic
More Less

Related notes for SOSC 2350

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit