Class Notes (835,297)
Canada (509,076)
York University (35,229)
Social Science (3,019)
SOSC 2652 (37)
Anna Pratt (32)
Lecture

Current Issues (II): Aboriginal Justice and Gladue

3 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Social Science
Course
SOSC 2652
Professor
Anna Pratt
Semester
Fall

Description
Lecture 19 Thursday March 13, 2014 Current Issues (II): Aboriginal Justice and Gladue 1. The “Crushing Failure of the CJS in relation to Aboriginal Peoples: commission, reports,  inquires.  2. S. 718(2) (e) and the 1999 SCC Gladue decision 3. Gladue Courts (Aboriginal Persons Courts) 4. Impact of Legal reform 5. Socio­historic context Aboriginal People: ­ More likely to be denied bail ­ Spend more time in pre­trail detention ­ More likely to be charged with multiple offences ­ Lawyers spend less time with them compared to their non­aboriginal applicants.  1. The “Crushing Failure of the CJS in relation to Aboriginal Peoples: commission, reports,  inquires.  • Under Policing  o As many as 824 missing and murdered aboriginal women in Canada o Concern that aboriginal victims are treated differently form non­aboriginal victims  o Over and under policing as two sides of the same coin o Examine whether and why there is a difference in the way police and Justice system  treat missing and murdered aboriginal victims.  o Why are there these racial biases?  o 1991 report concluded that in the Canadian context, aboriginal are subjected to over  policing for more minor and petty offences (drinking, theft) and under policing for  more serious violent offences (murdered, missing rape) o Over policing and under policing are two sides of the same coin. Both share the  same severe consequences, lack of trust towards the CJS.  o Jonathan Rudin******* o CJS is in many ways thoroughly alien to traditional aboriginal practices and meaning  of justice and this alienation needs to be understood in the context of colonialism in  Canada.  2. S. 718(2) (e) and the 1999 SCC Gladue decision • “A court that imposes a sentence shall take into consideration the following principles: o (e) All available sanctions other than imprisonment that are reasonable in the  circumstances should be considered for all offenders, with particular attention paid  to the circumstances of aboriginal offenders.  • Restorative Justice  o Resonate more closely to the traditions of Aboriginals o Substantive and meaningful alternative rather than retributive approach.  o Approach to crime that focuses on repairing damage and healing relationships.  o Abstract Values, social harming, healing, participation, these are all hard to argue  against when trying to go against restorative justice.  o It isn’t a particular program but rather a set of principles and be used in a variety of  different ways and different programs.  o Conditional sentencing: also a form of restorative justice. More tailored  individualized approach of sentencing outside the prison. 3. Gladue: killed her common law spouse • Accused at the time of the offence the accused was provoked by the person • Accused had a hyper­thyroid conditions made her react in more extreme ways in  emotional situations • She also showed signs of remorse and entered a plea of guilty • The sentencing judge also identified several aggravating factors o Stabbed the victim twice and the second time was after her common law husband  had been trying to escape while he was fleeing. It was clear that the accused had  every intention of harming the victims. He also noted that she wasn’t afraid of the  victim and was aggressor in the situation. He decided that in light of all these factors  it would not be appropriate to give the a conditional sentence he also noted further  that there were no special circumstances that he had to take into consideration that  she was Aboriginal. Both were living off the reserve in the Urban area and where not  within the Aboriginal Community o The offence was very serious and appropriate sentence was three years  imprisonment. Dismisse
More Less

Related notes for SOSC 2652

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit