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SOCI 3630 (19)
Lecture

SOCI 3630 Jan 22.docx

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Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 3630
Professor
Alireza Asgharzadeh
Semester
Winter

Description
AP/SOCI 3630 6.0A The Sociology of Education January 22, 2014 The Growth of Critical Race Theory • CRT offers: A critical examination of the role of the state and societal institutions. • It addresses the social construction of difference and interlocking systems of  oppression. • Situates power relations at the center of the analysis of race and social difference. • Focuses on the urgent need for a social system that is more representative,  equitable, inclusive and capable of responding to the concerns and aspirations of  marginalized communities. • CRT emphasizes the role of narrative/storytelling to analyze racism. Critical Race Theory and the Anti­Racism Movement • Anti­racism is defined as an action oriented strategy for institutional and systemic  change; • It addresses racism and the interlocking systems of social oppression in diverse  environments. • It suggests that racist institutional policies and practices are central to the  problems of racism today. • Thus, anti racism refers to the measures and mechanisms designed by the state,  institutions, organizations, groups and individuals­ to counteract racism. • Aims of anti­racism are by definition oppositional Anti Racism Education • Anti­racism education may be defined as an action oriented strategy to interrogate  racism and the interlocking systems of social oppression for the purpose of  institutional and systemic change particularly in educational and pedagogical  centers. • ARE was formulated in the USA and Britain, appearing in Canadian context in  late 1980s and is still evolving. • Result of minority communities drawing attention to the way racism limited life  chances of their children. • Aiming to change discriminatory institutional and organizational policies and  practices. • Based on the principle that race is anchored in experiences of racial minorities in  society and in the school, and that anti­racism is a tool for social change. • From late 1980s to the mid 1990s: a catalyst for some boards of education to  develop new policies. • Introduction of various programs including: ­ Training educators in anti­racism ­ Reviews of personnel practices ­ Analysis of assessment and placement procedures ­ Introduction of employment equity strategies ­ Review curriculum materials to identify racial bias ­ Development of AR curriculum resources and strategies Basic Principles of Anti Racism Education 1. Recognition of the social effects of race, despite the concept’s lack of scientific  basis. 2. Recognition of intersections of all forms of oppression 3. Acknowledgement of the power and privilege of whiteness in society (Du Bois) 4. Acknowledgement of marginalization and delegitimation of certain knowledge’s  and experiences. 5. Acknowledgement of the need for a holistic understanding/appreciation of the  human experience 6. Acknowledgement of a relationship between identity formation and schooling  experience 7. Acknowledgement of the need to address the challenge of difference and diversity  in schooling, and by extension, in the larger society. 8. Acknowledgement of the role of education in the production and reproduction of  racial, class, and gender inequalities. 9. The acknowledgement that school problems experiences by students cannot be  understood in isolation from larger social, economic, and political issues in  society. 10. The questioning of the views that sees ‘family’ or ‘home environment’ as a source  of the problems that students experience in schools. Racism in Canadian Education • Educational institutions form a system of structured inequality based on race,  class, etc. • Racial­minority and white students have similar career and professional  aspirations when entering the school system, the outcomes are markedly different. Formal Curriculum (FC) • Experiences 
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