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Lecture 54

JOUR 601 Lecture 54: Media Effects


Department
Journalism
Course Code
JOUR 601
Professor
Robin Blom
Lecture
54

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Media Effects
Let’s look at example to make it clear:
Let’s say we have three real-world issues and they all are very important but there is only
limited space in the paper and broadcast:
Real world issue #1
Real world issue #2 Gatekeeper
Real world issue #3
All these issues are begging for attention but the gatekeeper has to decide which issues to
cover because some can’t move forward
It turns out the gatekeeper decides issue #1 is most important and it’s on tv/ We are hoping
that people are watching tv at the time the program takes place.
If this happens, the person gets a survey phone call asking for the most important problem and
they say issue #1
This is the chain we are looking at.
Gatekeeping is the first part of this process when journalists make decisions on what gets
covered and puts it out there to the public in a tangible medium
Gatekeeping is closely related to framing. It is important to understanding how agenda setting
takes place, which starts with selecting topics. This is related to first-level agenda setting.
After gatekeeping occurs, then we look at to what extent it has affected the audience in
accepting that the most important problems are reflected on the tv or in newspapers
It is important to understanding how agenda setting takes place (in the gatekeeping process)
which starts with selecting topics. This is related to first-level agenda setting.
The attributes of a story, like sources, way it’s described, etc, are available for the audience and
may change what they know or believe about the world.
This is also agenda setting provided by the news media to the audience. This is called second
level agenda setting.
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