Class Notes (836,053)
United States (324,323)
Boston College (3,565)
History (453)
HIST 1031 (33)
Lecture

Unit 7-At the Margins of Modern Europe Lectures

5 Pages
70 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIST 1031
Professor
Robert Savage
Semester
Fall

Description
Unit 7: At the Margins of Modern Europe  Week 1: Upset and Unrest The Jewish Ghetto 12/2/13 • New realities for Jews living in new areas • Story of the Jews in the modern world o Expulsion from the west in light of the reformation • Demographic changes o Most population centers for Jews are in Germany, Northern Italy, Poland,  Lithuania, and eastern Europe o Going to stay in these areas until the Holocaust o Jews in Amsterdam­came from the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492 o Sephardic Jews= Jews from Iberia o Ashkenazi Jews=Jews from Northern Europe o Jews also moved to the ottoman empire­the Islamic world was much more  accepting/ friendlier to Jews and provided a more stable life o Sephardic Jews were also in the New World o Jews who were “expelled” from Spain could/would go to other Spanish  controlled areas­eg. New world or the Spanish controlled Amsterdam  o Benedict, formerly known as Baruch Spinoza, was kicked out of Spain for  being a Sephardic jew o Population of Jewish Europe 1­3% • Jews were tightknit urban dwellers o Minorities tend to live in cities o Prague in 1700 was a major hub for Jews  Jewish population jumped from 6000 to 11,500  Jews were 1/3 of the city population o Poland and Lithuania were also major hubs for Jews th  500 to 13,000 Jews during the 16  century  Poland made for 1/3­1/2 of the total Jewish population in 1648  Eastern Europe was a cultural center for Jews o Jews were 5% of the European population, but 15­20% of the urban  population o Jews had to wear special clothing to distinguish themselves o Ghetto of Venice, Florence, and Rome o Kept in the Ghetto’s with gates and gate guards o Gate guards were Christian but paid by the Jews o Prior to 1513 o The expulsion of the Jews was always a possibility until 1573 o Where there were Ghettos, expulsion ended o Provided them a protection o Many times Jews housed themselves together o Christians entered the ghettos because they were cheap o Tourists came to the ghettos o Could be a source of unity but tended to make boundaries between Jews  with different languages of cultures o This created a lot of tension • Reformed Europe o Dutch clergy was more concerned with Christians than the Jews o Many reformed churches identified with the Jews  Luther considered “real” Jews to be of the Hebrew bible  ▯they  were no longer the chosen people with the coming of Christ  ▯the  REFORMED church was the new chosen people   Anti­Judaism is not towards Jews but the stereotype was now used  for Christians  ▯Luther grew more hostile towards all other  religions, even the Jews, although he believed they would be  converted at the end of time   The reformed marginalized the Jews  ▯wanted to “out Jew the  Jews” and become the new Israel  ▯as a result, the Jews lost their  historical significance and were seriously antagonized  • The Humanist approach led to more acceptance of the Jews  o Isaac Perevius said that when the Christians persecute the Jews, they are  dong the same thing that the Jews did to Christ when he died on the cross ▯   they were being hypocritical  o You cannot kill someone in the name of God  ▯there was a shared  humanity between the Jews and the Christians that lead to a new  fascination of the Jewish traditions and scripture  ▯heightened in the  reformation  ▯interest in the Hebrew bible, the Talmud, the Kabbalah  ▯the  Talmud, or the oral tradition, interested humanists  • Pico studied the kabbalah  ▯he was interested in alchemy, a Jewish  science, and magic, etc.   ▯regarded the kabbalah as ancient  wisdom or the antique truth  • Printing made these books widely available  ▯Leon Modena made  published the history of the Jewish tradition  and practices  ▯he was   a practicing Jew who provided a different view and normalized  Judaism  ▯the Yiddish language, unique to the Jews, grew as a  result of printing  th • British Universities were developed in the 15  century  o In 1564, David Provencal and his son outlined a Jewish university with  two principles  o 1. Religious education o 2. Secular education o The school provided Jews with a  “Christian” education without  the Christians  ▯taught students Latin (the language of education and the  west) and Hebrew, Jewish thought, deportment or how to hold yourself  well in society, Western literature and the sciences  ­There was increased engagement between the Jews and Christians, however there was  stull much antagonism between the two groups  • Many slang terms and inappropriate propaganda were used against the Jews and  their traditional views  ▯Ghettos further separated Jews from society  ▯both  confined them and protected them  ▯a new Jewish state developed as they became  more global and European  ▯lived more stationary lives, less migration  Glorious Revolutions 12/4/13 The Godly in the Modern World:  The people’s overturn of the government  The Godly were puritans who traveled to the new world and formed colonies • From 1649­1660  ▯some stayed, but most returned home to England and Europe  • The Virginia colony: British­s
More Less

Related notes for HIST 1031

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit