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Isaiah.docx

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Department
Honors Program
Course
HONR 1101
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Emily McClure Isaiah 1 & 2 In the prophetic book of Isaiah, we are able to see two drastically different perspectives of God between First Isaiah and Second Isaiah. I think this demonstrates how dynamic God can be, and God’s mood change between the books seems to make Him more relatable to humankind – to me it makes Him seem more emotionally attached and emotionally vulnerable, which I like. To begin, in First Isaiah we find God to be extremely angry with His chosen people. He is impassioned, wrathful, and condemning towards them. His immense investment in the human race does not yield the results He had been hoping for, but instead, a people filled with greed and sin. God’s image in First Isaiah is one of hurt and disappointed, followed by a God who is determined to renew and purify His people in a powerful way. He speaks to Isaiah and tells him that He will destroy the people and their evilness: “‘How long, O Lord?’I asked.And he replied: Until the cities are desolate, without inhabitants, Houses without people, and the land is a desolate waste. Until the Lord sends the people far away, and great is the desolation in the midst of the land” (Isaiah 6:11-12). God claims that He will only stop when one tenth of the people remain, and He will start anew with these few who He calls the “holy people”. Much of First Isaiah is about God’s plan for destruction and reasons for doing so. However, towards the end we start to see His changing mood and a new hope for the people. God chooses to show mercy and deliver his city of Jerusalem from the king ofAssyria. He says, “By the way he [Assyria] came he shall leave, never coming as far as this city, oracle of the Lord. I will shield and save this city for my own sake and the sake of David my servant” (Isaiah 37:34-35). This image of God is for merciful and begins the transition into Second Isaiah. In Second Isaiah, we find a remarkably
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