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Plato Socrates Essay.docx

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School
Boston College
Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1070
Professor
Mavis Fenn
Semester
Fall

Description
Chantz Delgado Philosophy of the Person I th September 27 , 2013 Topic B: Two Accusations In Plato’s The Apology, Plato writes about the trial that his teacher, Socrates is  undergoing, in which he is charged with not believing in the Gods, and corrupting the  youth of Athens. Socrates attempts to defend himself extensively on both of these  accounts. According to the accusers, “Socrates does injustice by corrupting the young, and  by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are  novel (Ap 24c, 73).” Socrates begins to defend himself by interrogating one of his main  accusers, Meletus. Socrates states that since he corrupts the youth, “Who makes them  better (Ap 24d, 73)?” Socrates is trying to establish the definition of a person who does  not corrupt the youth. Meletus states that the laws make the youth better even though  Socrates was asking for a human example. Meletus defends himself and claims that the  judges make the youth better. Socrates begins to constantly question him and this results  in Meletus agreeing that the entire population of Athens makes the youth better,  excluding Socrates. It is clear that Meletus believes that everyone is trustworthy, loyal,  and devoted to the good of the community despite Socrates. This further exemplifies the  idea that Socrates was asserting in the beginning of the trial. Socrates believes that many  of the Athenians who are witnessing the trial have been corrupted since their childhood.  Socrates closes out his defense on this accusation by using an analogy related to the  expertise of a horse trainer. Socrates questions Meletus asking if he believes that all  humans make horses better, while one person is the corrupter. Socrates poses his belief by  stating that it is the opposite because “one certain [person] is able to make them better­or
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