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Philosophy 4-11.docx

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Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1070
Professor
Robert Mc Gill
Semester
Spring

Description
Philosophy 04/11/2014 Rousseau on Inequality 2. Primitive Society Noble Savage has become fully human Self­aware Capable of moral feelings, virtue, and vice No significant inequality exists 3. Agriculture and Metallurgy Cooperative activity & complex division of labor Complex schemes of cooperation Goods are produced beyond necessity Desires multiply, luxuries become necessities People become dependent on the labor of others Rise of property and unequal ownership ▯  INEQUALITIES Inequalities magnify status competitions Primitive Society ▯ Cooperative Activity ▯ Leisure Time ▯ Procure Conveniences and Luxuries = Beginning  of The End “The First  yoke them imposed on themselves without realizing it.” –Rousseau  uxuries and conveniences are a   constraining burden  Luxuries are addictive and foster unhappiness Conveniences soften the body and mind We both become less able to satisfy our own desires Agriculture and Metallurgy Inequalities  magnify status competitions Emergence of deception and cunning It can be advantageous to seem other than one is Emergence of distinction between Being vs. Appearing to be 4. Political Society Rich trick poor into agreeing to “right” of property The earth belongs to all in common The consent of all mankind would be necessary to justify claims to ownership Inequality, competition, & deceptioDespotism Slow and Gradual Process of Development Brute animality in the state of nature Causal Cooperation Golden age of moderate sociability Primitive Society; no relations of dependence Agriculture and metallurgy Corruption, inequality, dependence emerge Political Society Rich trick the poor ▯ despotism Development of Political Society is the  cause  of inequality. So, it should take  steps to  reduce  inequality. Role of government is to maintain natural freedom and equality 
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