Class Notes (838,203)
United States (325,314)
Boston College (3,569)
Philosophy (307)
PHIL 1090 (61)
Lecture

David Hume Inquiry Human Understanding.docx

5 Pages
53 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 1090
Professor
Daniel Frost
Semester
Fall

Description
David Hume: Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding 01/28/2014 Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding Along with Adam Smith and Thomas Reid, Hume is perhaps the most famous of the “Scottish  Enlightenment” He is perhaps the most famous empiricist “all knowledge comes from the senses” and ,as such, one of the  most famous skeptics we have good reason to doubt most of what we think we know He continues to point out his philosophy is important in its negative aspect What he means is the task of philosophy is to show the limits of our knowledge, not necessarily positing  what we know Kant will call this “critical philosophy” Show limitations of reason to leave room for faith Section 2: “Of the Origin of Ideas” All perceptions of the mind can be divided into two species based n “force and vivacity” Impressions (all our more lively immediate perceptions­, hearing, seeing, etc., willing, desiring, etc) Thoughts (ideas)(copies) All objects of human knowledge are thus Matters of fact (synthetically true by sense experience (a posteriori) and add to our knowledge) Some bachelors rock handlebar mustaches This doesn’t have to be true necessarily Only thing that can expand your knowledge Relations of Ideas (analytically true without need for investigation (a priori)) All bachelors are unmarried men Don’t have to do any research to prove this Concept of bachelor has concept of unmarried in it All of our ideas are nothing but copies of our impressions It is impossible for us to think of anything which we have not antecedently felt by either external or internal  senses Conclusion: when we entertain therefore any suspicion that a philosophical term is employed without any  meaning or idea (as is but too frequent), we need but inquire from what impression is that supposed idea  derived From what sense impression comes the idea of causation? Hume says we have no justification to think that causation exists All we have is custom/habit, the assumption that what has happened in the past will happen again Hume on Miracles Conclusions are founded on infallible experience he expects the event with the least degree of assurance 
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 1090

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit