Class Notes (838,387)
United States (325,381)
Boston College (3,569)
Sociology (143)
SOCY 2210 (1)
Lecture

research methods.docx

12 Pages
116 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCY 2210
Professor
Sarah Babb
Semester
Spring

Description
Obama’s candicacy/hoax citizenship 01/13/2014 1/13/14 Epistemology: the study of the origins, nature, and limits of human knowledge  What is “knowing”­ it’s a stretch of assumed knowledges are “certain” to be true (i.e. Professor’s here teaching class. Is she? Or are we hooked up to some virtual reality like in matrix) “Birther” movement: a theory proposed by fringe theorists, or birthers, that have sought court rulings to  declare Obama, or any president without certifiable birth rights to the US, ineligible to take office. Birthers used claims of Obamas nationality to be a citizen of Kenya to grant themselves access to  documents that would further strengthen their claims of Obamas citizenship How do we know Obama is actually a citizen?  Have we seen the documents? Have we witnessed the birth? Do we listen to the governor of Hawaii or a skeptic newscaster with many trades  Would we be able to “function” without authorities telling us what problems/beliefs to blindly believe. What is credible to knowledge?  What are credible sources Do we believe a collection of facts? Or do we believe any statements Why would people believe Obama isn’t a citizen? It may be better in their interests Things are what they look like aka stereotypes have some truth appearances are deceiving  Unless there is real proof to solidify his citizenship people will not believe its truth Things can be forged nowadays (maybe his citizenship was made up) Certificate of “life” vs. certificate of birth Should we choose who to listen to or do we follow beliefs that resemble our own? Ways of Knowing 01/13/2014 Knowledge from Personal Inquiry  We know because we see from personal experience  (i.e.) We stick our finger outside to see if its cold/warm/hot Problems: Things that make our knowledge from personal inquiry a misperception would be  photosynthesis, etc. things we can’t empirically experience Overgeneralization: we take our limited sample of reality and we generalize based on that example in  misleading ways May be looking at smaller examples instead of bigger ones  Selective Observation: our brains are wired to notice some things and NOT other things i.e. notice more when women are bad drivers instead of men as bad drivers cause you were told women  are bad drivers Premature Closure: human tendency to say “I’ve seen enough evidence and I am sure this tendency is true,  so I am not open to any other evidence” (this is an unconscious thing) Knowledge from Authority  You believe something to be true because someone you respect has told you this is true Problems: the source may be wrong, or the source may be lying Most of what we believe comes from authorities A person that doesn’t believe the authorities: skeptic  Knowledge from Scientific research Images iron clad reliability/stereotypical image of MAD SCIENTIST but actual image is like a normal  conference full of well­dressed people Science is a community a social system for producing knowledge System is set­up to correct highlighted phenomena and that keeps people skeptical Problem: how can you really know that the knowledge of authority is truth authority being a scientist,  chemist, biologist, etc.  You can choose to believe this research or other AUTHORITATIVE figure Skepticism: a questioning attitude towards factual claims that are taken for granted elsewhere All skepticism is SELECTIVE skepticism (usually)  Choosing to believe one set of authorities as opposed to another set of authorities Climate Change Debate 01/13/2014 Are global temperatures really rising? If so….  How much of the change is due to human activities? (anthropogenic)? Personal experience does not help figure out climate change Question like this we have to rely on authority What will the consequences be? Pigliucci is arguing that we should take scientists opinion that this is happening BUT who do we choose to  believe which authorities are “right?” Pigliucci’s RULE OF THUMB*  look at the credentials of the people making the arguments look at the sources used by the people making the arguments reliable sources are peer­reviewed articles by scholars of the same field look at who the experts are siding with look at the logic and internal consistency of the arguments being made Why do we rely on popular resources? Most people don’t have access Takes people many years to READ academic journal articles Where’s the time? We naturally turn to the second­hand authorities (the authorities on the authorities) 01/13/2014 The purposes of social research: Description: painting a detailed picture of the social world i.e. the gender at play  Explanation: interested in explaining why something happens i.e. changes in attitude Exploration: Topic that hasn’t been covered exactly yet and it sets a precedence for other researchers to  use.  Research Topic: Crime & Deviance Research Question: How does gender influence power dynamics between inmates and corrections  officers? Explanatory with descriptive elements  Qualitative: field notes, interview transcripts Research Question: What is the relationship between education and criminality? Descriptive survey,  government data/criminal records Research Question: Does being a high school drop out make you more likely to commit a crime?  Explanatory Quantitative research: survey, government data/criminal records Social researchers collect two different sorts of “data” or information: Quantitative data: numbers, or categories that are counted, looks like a whole bunch of lines on a  spreadsheet. Tends to be used by researchers who engage in more of a positivistic approach using  scientific language Questions that include more likely, less likely there is a quantitative quality because you can quantify how  much more/less something is Qualitative data: expressed as words, pictures. Tend to be used by researchers who engage in more of a  relativistic approach and use the language of humanists. Resources used would be texts and interviews  from actual subjects Research Topic: Racial inequality in the criminal justice system Research Question: Are African American drivers more likely than European American drivers to be  stopped by the police? Research Method: Using Quantitative data. Use a field experiment Send out of AA or EA and see what happens. Unit of Analysis: A unit about which information is collected.  i.e. individuals, households (Census), countries(World bank does studies researching economic) Variable: A characteristic that can vary from one unit of analysis to another i.e. race, gender, # of times… 01/13/2014 Dependent Variable: the “effect” variable, or the one that we expect is being influenced Independent Variable: the “cause” variable, or the one we expect is doing the influencing Hypothesis: A testable statement about how two or more variables are expected to relate to one another i.e. African American drivers are more likely than European American drivers to be stopped by the police.  ***NEVER SAY DATA PROVES ANYTHING IT ONLY SUPPORTS But—is it police racial bias that causes differences in rates, is blackness causing these drivers to be  stopped more frequently? Establishing causality: Three Necessary Conditions: That the two variables (independent & dependent) are associated That the independent precedes (or at least doesn’t come after) the dependent variable in time i.e. (drug use and homelessness)  That there is no third variable that is responsible for the association 01/13/2014 Laud’s experiment exemplifies the “gray” areas of research method ethics Ethics: are values/standards/principles expected of yourself/from society Social scientists are to report their findings honestly Ex: biomedical experiments  Clinical trials: drug experiment run on humans for medicinal purposes Tuskegee Syphilis Study (1936­1972): a clinical study run on humans (400 men that had syphilis/200 men  that did not have syphilis mostly African american) the scientists did not tell the hum
More Less

Related notes for SOCY 2210

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit