Class Notes (835,007)
United States (324,008)
Boston College (3,565)
Theology (166)
THEO 1161 (23)
Lecture

3rd & 4th Noble Truths (9-17-13).docx

3 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Theology
Course
THEO 1161
Professor
John Makransky
Semester
Fall

Description
Third and Fourth Noble Truths  09/17/2013 RQ Handout on the 3  and 4th Noble Truths Third Noble Truth: Cessation of Suffering, Nirvana Recall the 2nd Noble Truth: inner causes of suffering­­­1) ignorance (that projects the appearance of an  unchanging, substantial self and world onto changing experiences), 2) clinging to those projections and  struggling to maintain them through self­clinging emotions (possessiveness, greed, anger, hatred, fear,  jealousy, etc.),  3) unskillful karma (actions reacting to the world as it looks and feels through such  destructive emotions). “Nirvā ṇ:” the Sanskrit root “nirvā” = to blow (like the wind); to blow out; to extinguish.  Nirvana is  the attainment of what lies beyond ignorance, clinging, and karma when they have been utterly blown out;  like the bright, clear sky seen only when the clouds disappear. The Buddha used a fire metaphor to  illustrate the dawning of nirvana when the inner causes of suffering cease­­­  Oxygen, fuel, spark as causes  give rise to fire/smoke/ashes.  Cut off one essential cause, oxygen, and the effect stops.  When fire goes  out, clear, empty space appears, now unobstructed by fire, smoke, ashes.   3rd Noble Truth:  When ignorance, clinging attachment and their tendencies in the mind are brought to  cessation, the process of self­grasping suffering stops, to reveal a clear, infinite, open dimension beyond  conditions of suffering = nirvana:  associated with qualities of deep inner freedom, tranquility, joy, impartial  love and compassion for others, ease, humor, penetrating knowing.      From one angle, nirvana can only be pointed to negatively by negating what obstructs awareness of it:  it is  what is seen when the clouds of clinging, ignorance, hatred completely cease; nirvana is also called the  ‘unborn,’ ‘uncreated,’ ‘unconditioned,’ ‘unceasing,’ ‘beyond thought,’ ‘the stopping of duhkha,’ ‘cessation’ (of  oppressive emotions and projections).    From another angle, positive metaphors are used that connote  blissful release, infinite openness, deep freedom, and ultimate safety: nirvana is ‘supreme bliss,’ ‘the island  amidst the flood,’ ‘the eternal’ (amrta), ‘beyond limit,’ ‘the infinite,’ ‘the cave of shelter’.  [[Nirvana is NOT an  infinite eternal thing (not a soul or entity), but infinite and eternal in being beyond all finite conceptual  constructs of space and time and unaffected by conditioned processes of mind, body and world.]]   Asian view, nirvana becomes vivid for people in Asia when they think about persons (holy) like Buddha that  they have heard about in stories and their cultures  Nirvana's most striking qualities are those embodied by holy persons believed to be far on the path to its  realization, who are depicted in story and legend (arhats, bodhisattvas, Southeast Asian forest retreat  masters, Zen masters, Tibetan lamas).  Such qualities include deep inner peace, stable attention, impartial  love and compassion, equanimity that sees everyone as the same in causes of suffering and potential of  freedom, joy, humor, humility, and wisdom discerning the patterns of beings’ minds.  Such qualities of  enlightenment are inseparable from the qualities cultivated on the path to its realization (the Fourth Noble  Truth discussed below). Example of nirvana embodied:  story of Hakuin and samurai, DL’s presence (joy in others’ being  free of ego­centered holding back), Thich Nhat Hanh. 4th Noble Truth­­  Three Trainings of Path:  Ethics, Meditative Concentration, Wisdom ­­Fourth Noble Truth as antidote for Second Truth:  The Fourth Noble Truth includes all the practices  derived from the Buddha's teaching that are understood to lead to the cessation of ignorance, clinging,  other destructive emotions, and unskillful karma, the cessation of the “sickness” described in the Second  Noble Truth, the cessation of nirvana.  Such practices comprise the "eight­fold path" described in Radiant  Mind pp. 91­97.  The 8­fold path is often summarized in   three kinds of training :  1) Ethical Discipline, 2) Meditative Concentration, 3) Penetra
More Less

Related notes for THEO 1161

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit