Class Notes (836,128)
United States (324,350)
Boston College (3,565)
Theology (166)
THEO 1161 (23)
Lecture

9-19-13 Mahayana .docx

4 Pages
37 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Theology
Course
THEO 1161
Professor
John Makransky
Semester
Fall

Description
Seven Key Doctrines of Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism   09/19/2013 • Systematic philosophy first few centuries after the Buddha dieAbhidharma ): Four Noble Truths,  etc.  • Up until now have been studying Theravada Buddhism (the way of the elders) the dominant school or  tradition of Buddhism in most of S. East Asia  • Ashoka­ emperor in the early 4  century BCE era, conqueror, came in after Alexander the Great’s  descendants, dynasty of Indian emperors who beat back the Greeks • India was not one cultural and linguistic entity, far more diverse than the U.S. even today  (Ashoka unified India for the first time in history) • Converted to Buddhism, after the empire was formed from blood declared no more competition  and war and put teachings of Buddhism foreword, provided social support to travelers, poor,  elderly, different religious communities   Buddhism shifts how people in India and all other lands in Central Asia, China, Japan etc. changes how  • people think in regard to native philosophies (Daoism, Hinduism, Christianity, etc.) and their religious  cultures are affecting how Buddhism is understood and practiced  • For a religion to immediately be integrated into a new culture and have meaning to that culture two  things needed; (1) need to be drawing on profound clear, recognizable, core foundational principles  (Four Noble Truths for example) very foundation of this tradition, (2) need to reformulate those  principles in fresh ways that meet the hearts and minds of people in that place and time  Recall the name of the 3  Noble Truth:  “cessation of suffering,” nirvana.   In early scholastic Buddhism, this was interpreted as a dualism of samsara and nirvana:  N and S  are essentially opposed—to attain N is to put an end to S: it is the cessation of destructive emotions, karma,  rebirth, the cessation of samsara that constitutes the nirvana of the arhats.      With the rise of Mahāyāna forms of Buddhism came a shift in emphasis toward non­dualism of  samsara and nirvana:  N as ultimate peace and freedom is not something that stands outside of S, or  is present only when S is brought to cessation, or is realized only when S is left behind.  Rather, the peace  and freedom of N is discovered as the deepest nature of S.  Seven Key Doctrines of Indian Mahayana Buddhism that developed from the first century  BCE through the eighth century CE.  These provide the doctrinal basis for developments of Buddhism in  East Asia and Tibet.  Look for these doctrines, whether explicit or implicit, in Thich Thien Anh’s book, Zen  Philosophy, Zen Practice. 1) Wisdom of emptiness (or “suchness”):  since all things exist only  interdependently  based on causes, conditions, and parts; all things lack, are mpty,  of separate,  independent existence.  What does this mean?  To look deeply into anything that appears to be singular  and separate from other things is to find no singular, separate entity there, since any apparent singular  breaks down into parts, causes, conditions, and relations.  All things, upon deep investigation, are thus  discovered to be intrinsically inter­dependent with all other things, and thus pty of self­existence.   The  Mahāyāna Perfection of Wisdom  scriptures (including the Heart sutra, Radiant Mind 177­8) call  this insight the “wisdom of emptiness” (śūnyatā) or wisdom of “suchness” (tathatā), an awareness that  recognizes the insubstantial nature of all things.  To realize the empty nature of each aspect of experience  is to realize the nirvanic nature OF this world, which is beyond reifying or grasping (rather than to realize  nirvana as something separate or apart from this world).  This awareness cuts through the karmic habit of  clinging to things, which is the root of suffering and rebirth.  To gradually realize emptiness while in this  world, then, is to become liberated from samsara while still living in samsara with others.  The  Bodhisattva who realizes this wisdom of emptiness thereby realizes his inter­dependence with all other  beings as his larger “self.”  He thus chooses to continue to take birth in the world, not from the karmic force  of clinging to things, but from a force of compassion for beings, to help them similarly attain the realization  of emptiness that brings freedom from suffering.  Hence, the path of the bodhisattva involves  cultivation of the wisdom of emptiness and compassion, while living and working with others over lifetimes  for the sake of their enlightenment (see 5 below on  bodhisattva path ).             2) Nirvana as undivided from samsara:  In accord with this teaching of emptiness, in  many Mahāyāna Buddhist texts, the nature of unconditioned freedom (nirvana) is no longer understood as  something apart from, or distant from, the world of ordinary experience (samsara).  Nirvana is the very  nature of this world, when this world is properly known and experienced as empty.  3) Buddha nature (nature of mind): Because Mahāyāna Buddhism came to identify  nirvana as the very essence of our being in its emptiness, many Mahāyāna practices of meditation and  ri
More Less

Related notes for THEO 1161

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit