Class Notes (838,076)
United States (325,281)
Boston College (3,565)
Theology (166)
THEO 1161 (23)
Lecture

9-12-13 Second Noble Truth.docx

5 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Theology
Course
THEO 1161
Professor
John Makransky
Semester
Fall

Description
Second Noble Truth  09/12/2013 2nd Noble Truth: Causes of Suffering (samudaya) Three basic inner causes of personal suffering are identified:  1.  Ignorance    misconceiving self and world as unchanging (Sanskrit: avidyā)   tendency to construct an identity, an isolated sense of self which is also separate from ones mind and body  as if there is a me separate from the body who owns the body 2. clinging attachment or possessiveness (Sanskrti: tṛṣṇ ā) together with other self­centered emotions that  stem from it (Sanskrit: kleśā­­  greed, aversion, anxiety, fear, hatred, jealousy, prejudice, egocentrism, etc. ),  and 3. harmful intentions and  actions   ( negative karma).   2nd Noble Truth in brief:   1) recall 1  Noble Truth teaching of impermanence.  The mind’s fear of the insubstantial nature of its  experience elicits a tendency to try to create a secure sense of self against the tide of change.   Mental  patterns create the appearance of an unchanging, substantial self and world out of the ever­changing flow  of experience.  This mental tendency is called "ignorance" (avidyā, literally, ‘mis­knowing’).  2)  In each situation, then, this “ignorance” projects a field of clinging  attachmen t    and aversion  onto other  beings and onto the world­­clinging to those who seem to support one’s thought of ‘self,’ feeling aversion for  those who seem to undermine one’s thought of ‘self.’ Attachment and aversion transform into a host of  other destructive emotions (calledkleśa ) in diverse situations: possessiveness, greed, hatred, fear,  jealousy, prejudice, pride, despair, etc.   3) These destructive emotions motivate harmful actions (negative  karma ): e.g. by mistaking one’s own  self­centered thoughts of persons for the actual persons, one tends to misreact to them as objects of  possessiveness, aversion, or apathy, causing suffering to self and others.  This is the "dependent  origination" of suffering (Kornfield, Radiant Mind 80­83).     2nd Noble Truth in fuller detail:   1.“Ignorance” translates a technical Sanskrit term, avidyā.  It refers to the tendency to conceptualize  changing phenomena as permanent things.  Importantly, it also refers to the tendency to construct an  identity, a sense of one’s self, as an autonomous, separate, unchanging thing: an isolated sense of self felt  to exist within mind and body yet also distinct from them (so we say  “my anger” as if there were an entity “I”  separate from “anger,” “my thought” as if there were an entity “I” separate from thought, who creates and  possesses the thoughts).  According to Buddhist teaching, through mindful attention to all components of  mind and body (to the five aggregates), one begins to see that “I,” “anger,” etc. are all constructs of thought.  “I” inot  the controllerpossessor  of thoughts, it is product  of thought.  That is why, says Kornfield  (Radiant Mind: 284.1) we can not simply stop the arising of thoughts, even if we wish to; there is no "self"  standing behind the thoughts who can stop them.  Rather “thoughts seem to think themselves” as the  natural outflow of prior conditions of mind/body.  The mere thought of self, of “I” or “me” is sufficient to  organize our experience and personality so we can function well—but there is no unchanging, substantial,  isolated self to be found of the sort that our minds tend to ascribe to the mere thought “I.”        2.  Clinging attachment, grasping, possessiveness— see Kornfield, Radiant Mind pp.  282bot.­283.   Within such “ignorance”, each situation is interpreted in a way that supports the impression  of an unchanging, concrete self (that doesn’t actually exist). In each situation, ignorance projects a field of  clinging attachment, aversion or apathy upon others, as the mind seeks to construct a secure  sense of self against the tide of change: clinging to those who seem to support one’s concept of “self,”  disliking those who seem to undermine one’s ‘self,” having apathy for those who don’t seem relevant to  one’s “self.” This makes a tiny window of insecurity upon a vast, momentary world, interpreting each  situation as a drama of concern for self, mistaking one’s self­concerned thoughts of others for the actual  fullness of other persons: clinging to persons/things that seem to support one’s self (“my friends”), fearing  and hating persons that seem to threaten one’s self (“my enemies”), while most don’t seem to matter  (“strangers”).   The full range oself­centered emotions  that flow from clinging attachment to self are  called “kleśā ” in Sanskrit, meaning destructive emotions such as possessiveness, hatred, fear, avarice,  pride, jealousy, prejudice, despair, hopelessness, etc.    3.  Karma  Such destructive emotions ( kleśā ) motivate actions harmful to self and others, actions that  are called “unskillful karma”akuśala­karma ). Karma literally means “action,” which can be either  “skillfulkuśala , bringing beneficial effects) or “unskillakuśala,  bringing harmful effects).  Unskillful,  negative karma occurs when we mistake our self­concerned, reductive thoughts of persons for the actual  persons, mis­reacting to them as just objects of possessiveness, aversion, or apathy.  As people re­act to  others through their own mental projections in that way, they make new karma, i.e. further imprint the habit  of experiencing the world through their own projections of others and reacting to their own projections  unawares (see article on course website called "Understanding Karma: Liberation").  That is the cycle of  samsara, which is extended in Buddhist co
More Less

Related notes for THEO 1161

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit