Class Notes (836,562)
United States (324,575)
Chemistry (610)
CAS CH 131 (61)
Lecture

Molecular Geometry, Polarity, and Oxidation Number

6 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CAS CH 131
Professor
Andrei Lapets
Semester
Fall

Description
Molecular Geometry, Polarity, and Oxidation number 09/18/2012 Lewis Dot Structures ­­­­­> actual molecular structure Triple bond = very short bond that requires a lot of energy to break Octet Rule Exceptions BF 3– Boron (and all in that column) tend(s) to have 6 electrons Formal charge(total electrons – (nonbonding + ½ bonding)) shows that B is more stable with 6 electrons SF 6– Sulfur likes 12 electrons All in the 3  row or greater can have more than 8 electrons If this is the case, make the terminal atoms obey the octet rule and have the central atom break it ­ I3 ­ central iodine would have 10 electrons while the outer ones would have 8 HCl – polar covalent bond (H tends to be 8+ while Cl tends to be 8­), dipole CCl 4– polar covalent bond, no dipole (1) molecular shape is the arrangement of atomic nuclei relative to each other (2) 3D arrangement of atoms in a molecule (3) bond length (distance between bonded atoms) (4) bond angle (angle formed by two bonds of 3 linked atoms) H 2 Bent structure, not linear 4 pairs of electrons 2 bonded, 2 unbonded first, minimize interaction by putting them as far as possible from each other second, how would it look in terms of electronic geometry tetrahedral arrangement lone pairs take up more space than bonded pairs VSEPR model Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion geometric arrangement of electron pairs around a central atom need to know lewis dot structure first (1) electron pairs repel one another (2) minimize repulsion forces (3) count lone pairs and bonds to atom (4) single, double, and triple bonds are treated the same (5) non­bonding electrons occupy more volume than bonding ones do (A) count number atoms around the central atom (steric number)
More Less

Related notes for CAS CH 131

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit