Class Notes (836,293)
United States (324,411)
CAS CS 101 (27)
Lecture

NOTES.docx

7 Pages
84 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Computer Science
Course
CAS CS 101
Professor
Aaron Stevens
Semester
Spring

Description
Computer Science Contacts: [email protected] [email protected] What is Computational Thinking? Encoding Information: converting data into an encoded form. Algorithms: a sequence of clear and precise step­by­step instructions for solving a  problem in a finite amount of time. Numbered Code: effective and simple. Ex. A is 1 and B is 2. Protocols: set of rules governing the exchange or transmission of data between  devices. Ex. Morse code Abstraction: is about hiding unnecessary details and retaining only the relevant  information. Computer: A computer takes an input, applies a process, and produces an output. Hardware: Physical parts of a computer Software: you cant see it or touch it. Instructions for the computer.  Abacus: note taking device invented around 2400 BC and it is not a computer but it  has encoding and decoding.  Pascal’s arithmetic machine: mechanical device to add, subtract, divide, and  multiply. Difference engine: Charles Babages’ mechanical calculating machine, designed in  the 1820’s. Jacquard’s Loom: (1801) making fabric by running threads together in different  orders in a automatic mechanical weaving loom that took instructions on which colors  and design to follow. Programmability: the ability to give a general­purpose computer instructions so that  it can perform new tasks. Early digital computers: ­Harvard Mark 1(1944) the tax payers paid for it and was overseen by the department  of defense. Could carry out computations electronically. (textbook). First fully  automatic digital computer to be completed.  Important players: • Steve Jobs • Bill Gates • Steve Wozniack Intel: invented the integrated circuit on a little chip. Gordon Moore founder, chairman  and still chairman.  Moore Law: we are going to get twice the amount of power on the same space every  two years. Integers A natural number, a negative number, zero Numbering System A numbering system assigns meaning to the position of the numeric symbol As a Gn­1ral Form n­2 0 dn * B  + 2 n­1B  + … + d  * B1 Binary Number Is base 2 and has 2, so we use only 2 symbols: 0,1 For a given base, valid numbers will only contain the digits in the base. A binary digit or bit can take on only these two values. Low voltage = 0 High voltage = 1 All bits have 0 or 1 Binary numbers are built by concatenating a string of bits together. Ex. 10101010 1 bit 0           1 2 bits 01 10 00 11 3 bits 000 001 010 100 110 011 111 101 n­1 n­2 0 dn * B  + 2  *n­1 + … + d  * B 1 1011  bit * 2 + 0 * 2  + 1 * 2 + 1 * 2 0 1011 = (1*8) + (0*4) + (1*2) + (1*1) = 11 bit dec 01101110 = (0*2 ) + (1*2 ) + (1*2 ) + (0*2 ) + (1*2 ) + (1*2 ) + (1*2 ) + (0*2 ) = 0 +  0 64 + 32 + 0 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 0 = 110(decimal) What is the binary equivalent of the decimal number 103? 103/2 = 51, remainder 1  ▯rightmost bit 51/2 = 25, remainder 1 25/2 = 12, remainder 1 12/2 = 6, remainder 0 6/2 = 3, remainder 0 3/2 = 1, remainder 1 ½ = 0, remainder 1  ▯leftmost bit 103 dec 00111 bin nd 2  way: seeing which power of 2 fits into the number, if a power does then subtract it  and put 1 bit, if it doesn’t put a zero. 201/2 = 100, remainder 1 100/2 = 50, remainder 0 50/2 = 25, remainder 0 25/2 = 12, remainder 1 12/2 = 6, remainder 0 6/2 = 3, remainder 0 3/2 = 1, remainder 1 ½ = 0, remainder 1 201 dec11001001 bin Byte 8 bits – a common unit of computer memory Word A computer word is a group of bits which are passed around together during  computation. The word length of the computer’s processor is how many bits are grouped together. • 8­bit machine (e.g. Nintendo Gameboy, 1989) • 16­bit machine (e.g. Sega Genesis, 1980) • 32­bit machines (e.g. Sony PlayStation, 1994) • 64­bit machines (e.g. Nintendo 64, 1996) Hexadecimal: 0  ▯F Each four bits map to a hex digit. mathisfun.com/binary­decimal A character set is a list of characters and the numbers (binary c0des) used
More Less

Related notes for CAS CS 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit