Class Notes (836,580)
United States (324,591)
History (216)
CAS HI 338 (13)
Lecture

1:21 - American Dreams

4 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
CAS HI 338
Professor
Michael Holm
Semester
Spring

Description
January 21 st American Dreams for the Post­War Era I. America & the End of World War II a. by the end of WWII, Americans are producing 70% of the world’s goods;  the only power to emerge from the war without any significant damage to  its economy or territory or population b. there is a conception of pre­World War II as “isolationist” which is  erroneous: Americans had a design on the world order going as far back as  1776 i. January 1776: Thomas Paine writes Common Sense and describes  America as an idea rather than a nation, preceding the birth of a  new world and the promotion of world peace and the end of  monarchial rule ii. new and unique breed of “nationalism” leading to the conviction  that Americans were a new and unique breed of people, i.e.  American exceptionalism iii. Paine also called for free commerce/trade, international unity,  prosperity to everyone everywhere: the Americanization of the  world iv. mid­19  century: America is prevented from taking a large part in  internathonal thfairs due to sectionalism and the Civil War v. late 19  – 20  century: industrialization &etc. indicate that  America is going to become the most powerful country in the  world 1. victories against Spain 2. Henry Cabot Lodge, Theodore Rooesvelt, Woodrow  th Wilson, all reiterate what Paine advocated in the 18   century 3. when Wilson takes America into WWI, it is for reasons of  “making the world safe for democracy” – thus the League  of Nations c. the vision therefore that Americans have following WWII is one that has a  long legacy originating with the country’s inception, and at no point were  they better positioned to take action with regards to that vision: Americans  gain a disproportionate say re: what the world will look like d. Americans were initially relatively hesitant to get into the war because  they believed their presence was unnecessary; however, with German  victories in Europe and Japanese victories in Asia, America realizes their  position in the world was being threatened i. 1940, Roosevelt: “arsenal of democracy” and an end to neutrality ii. March, 1941: The Lend­Lease Act authorizing the President to  “sell, transfer title to, etc. to any such government whose defense  the President deems vital to the defense of the U.S. any defense  article” was the end of American neutrality 1. this aid was not free; the kind of repayment it demanded  was in the untraditional form of policy concessions  II. The Atlantic Charter a. August, 1941: FDR and Churchill meet in Canada to discuss the shape of  the world following WWII i. FDR lays out a “humanitarian” vision and makes it clear to  Churchill that he wants to end the balance of power system; no  more concessions of territory as part of postwar settlements;  international organization based on liberal principles ii. Churchill, grand supporter of the British Empire, comes hoping for  an official declaration of war from the United States iii. U.S. Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles must explain to  Permanent under Secretary for Foreign Affairs Sir Alexander  Cadogan America’s agenda – Welles did not shy away from  applying firm pressure, particularly regarding the “freest possible  economic interchange without discrimination” etc b. the charter itself called for: i. no territorial gains for victorious powers ii. territorial adjustments only in accord with the wishes of the  peoples concerned iii. national self­determination iv. free trade v. global economic cooperation & advancement of social welfare: a  very untraditional and unfamiliar concept in international politics vi. “a world free of want and fear” vii. freedom of the seas viii. disarmament of aggressor nations, and a postwar system of secrity  established c. in sum: an American demand that the era of empires is effectively at an  end d. January 1942: the nations at war with Germany committed themselves to  the Atlantic Charter and to defend “life, liberty, independence, and  religious freedom, and to preserve human rights in their own land as well  as in other lands” e. Welles & VP Henry Wallace gave speech after speech calling for an  American­led world order i. “Discrimination between peoples because of their race, creed, or  color must be abolished. The age of imperialism is ended… in all  oceans and in all continents.”  ii. “[The Bible]… was not given complete and powerful political  e
More Less

Related notes for CAS HI 338

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit